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QGIS Planet

Creating reports in QGIS

QGIS 3 has a new feature: reports! In short, reports are the good old Altas feature on steroids.

Let’s have a look at an example project:

To start a report, go to Project | New report. The report window is quite similar to what we’ve come to expect from Print Composer (now called Layouts). The most striking difference is the report panel at the left side of the screen.

When a new report is created, the center of the report window is empty. To get started, we need to select the report entry in the panel on the left. By selecting the report entry, we get access to the Include report header and Include report footer checkboxes. For example, pressing the Edit button next to the Include report header option makes it possible to design the front page (or pages) of the report:

Similarly, pressing Edit next to the Include report footer option enables us to design the final pages of our report.

Now for the content! We can populate our report with content by clicking on the plus button to add a report section or a “field group”. A field group is basically an Atlas. For example, here I’ve added a field group that creates one page for each country in the Natural Earth countries layer that I have loaded in my project:

Note that in the right panel you can see that the Controlled by report option is activated for the map item. (This is equivalent to a basic Atlas setup in QGIS 2.x.)

With this setup, we are ready to export our report. Report | Export Report as PDF creates a 257 page document:

As configured, the pages are ordered by country name. This way, for example, Australia ends up on page 17.

Of course, it’s possible to add more details to the individual pages. In this example, I’ve added an overview map in Robinson projection (to illustrate again that it is now possible to mix different CRS on a map).

Happy QGIS mapping!

Freedom of projection in QGIS3

If you have already designed a few maps in QGIS, you are probably aware of a long-standing limitation: Print Composer maps were limited to the project’s coordinate reference system (CRS). It was not possible to have maps with different CRS in a composition.

Note how I’ve been using the past tense? 

Rejoice! QGIS 3 gets rid of this limitation. Print Composer has been replaced by the new Layout dialog which – while very similar at first sight – offers numerous improvements. But today, we’ll focus on projection handling.

For example, this is a simple project using WGS84 as its project CRS:


In the Layouts dialog, each map item now has a CRS property. For example, the overview map is set to World_Robinson while the main map is set to ETRS-LAEA:

As you can see, the red overview frame in the upper left corner is curved to correctly represent the extent of the main map.

Of course, CRS control is not limited to maps. We also have full freedom to add map grids in yet another CRS:

This opens up a whole new level of map design possibilities.

Bonus fact: Another great improvement related to projections in QGIS3 is that Processing tools are now aware of layers with different CRS and will actively reproject layers. This makes it possible, for example, to intersect two layers with different CRS without any intermediate manual reprojection steps.

Happy QGIS mapping!

(Nederlands) QGIS gebruikersmiddagnieuws

Sorry, this entry is only available in the Dutch language

PostgreSQL back end solution for quality assurance and data archive

Did you know that the possibilities to make a full QGIS back end solution for quality assurance and archiving in PostgreSQL are immense? SQL has it’s well known limitations, but with a little bit creativity you can make quite nice

24 Days of QGIS 3.0 Features

If you’re not following @northroadgeo on Twitter, you’ve probably missed our recent “24 Days of QGIS” countdown. Over December, we’ve been highlighting 24 different features which are coming with the QGIS 3.0 release. We’ve collected all of these below so you can catch up:

We hope you enjoyed the series! In it we’ve only highlighted just a few of the hundreds of new features coming in QGIS 3.0. There’s also a lot of behind-the-scenes changes which we haven’t touched, e.g. a switch to Python 3 and Qt 5 libraries, a brand new, rewritten QGIS server, new QGIS web client, enhanced metadata integration, GeoNode integration, a cleaner, stabler, easier PyQGIS API, 1000s more unit tests, and so much more.

You can download a 3.0 beta from the QGIS webpage, and report feedback at https://issues.qgis.org. A huge thanks to the mammoth effort of all the QGIS contributors, this is going to be a great release!

Copernicus for Agriculture – Industry Workshop

 

The post Copernicus for Agriculture – Industry Workshop appeared first on GFOSS Blog | GRASS GIS Courses.

2nd International Electronic Conference on Remote Sensing

The 2nd International Electronic Conference on Remote Sensing (ECRS-

The post 2nd International Electronic Conference on Remote Sensing appeared first on GFOSS Blog | GRASS GIS Courses.

2nd Mapping Water Bodies from Space Conference

Background

The post 2nd Mapping Water Bodies from Space Conference appeared first on GFOSS Blog | GRASS GIS Courses.

Wind and Renewable Energy 2018

With the grand success of Wind & Renewable Energy 2016, Conferen

The post Wind and Renewable Energy 2018 appeared first on GFOSS Blog | GRASS GIS Courses.

38th Annual EARSeL Symposium

Climate change, overpopulation, overexploitaion of natural resources

The post 38th Annual EARSeL Symposium appeared first on GFOSS Blog | GRASS GIS Courses.

Climate Show 2018

The International Climate Show will be held at Palexpo, Geneva from

The post Climate Show 2018 appeared first on GFOSS Blog | GRASS GIS Courses.

EO & Copernicus Technologies

Earth observation and Copernicus – the European Copernicus Programme

The post EO & Copernicus Technologies appeared first on GFOSS Blog | GRASS GIS Courses.

3rd joint EARSeL LULC & NASA LCLUC Workshop

Following the success of the two previous EARSeL Special Interest Gr

The post 3rd joint EARSeL LULC & NASA LCLUC Workshop appeared first on GFOSS Blog | GRASS GIS Courses.

European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2018

The EGU General Assembly 2018 will bring together geoscientists from

The post European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2018 appeared first on GFOSS Blog | GRASS GIS Courses.

8th European Algae Industry Summit

Following the success of its previous editions, ACI’s 8th European A

The post 8th European Algae Industry Summit appeared first on GFOSS Blog | GRASS GIS Courses.

QGIS 3 compiling on Windows

As the Oslandia team work exclusively on GNU/Linux, the exercise of compiling QGIS 3 on Windows 8 is not an everyday’s task :). So we decided to share our experience, we bet that will help some of you.

Cygwin

The first step is to download Cygwin and to install it in the directory C:\cygwin (instead of the default C:\cygwin64). During the installation, select the lynx package:

 

Once installed, you have to click on the Cygwin64 Terminal icon newly created on your desktop:

Then, we’re able to install dependencies and download some other installers:

$ cd /cygdrive/c/Users/henri/Downloads
$ lynx -source rawgit.com/transcode-open/apt-cyg/master/apt-cyg > apt-cyg
$ install apt-cyg /bin
$ apt-cyg install wget git flex bison
$ wget http://download.microsoft.com/download/D/2/3/D23F4D0F-BA2D-4600-8725-6CCECEA05196/vs_community_ENU.exe
$ chmod u+x vs_community_ENU.exe
$ wget https://cmake.org/files/v3.7/cmake-3.7.2-win64-x64.msi
$ wget http://download.osgeo.org/osgeo4w/osgeo4w-setup-x86_64.exe
$ chmod u+x osgeo4w-setup-x86_64.exe

CMake

The next step is to install CMake. To do that, double clic on the file cmake-3.7.2-win64-x64.msi previously downloaded with wget. You should choose the next options during the installation:

 

Visual Studio

Then, we have to install Visual Studio and C++ tools. Double click on the vs_community_ENU.exe file and select the Custom installation. On the next page, you have to select Visual C++ chekbox:

 

 

OSGeo4W

In order to compile QGIS, some dependencies provided by the OSGeo4W installer are required. Double click on osgeo4w-setup-x86_64.exe and select the Advanced Install mode. Then, select the next packages:

  •  expat
  • fcgi
  • gdal
  • grass
  • gsl-devel
  • iconv
  • libzip-devel
  • libspatialindex-devel
  • pyqt5
  • python3-devel
  • python3-qscintilla
  • python3-nose2
  • python3-future
  • python3-pyyaml
  • python3-mock
  • python3-six
  • qca-qt5-devel
  • qca-qt5-libs
  • qscintilla-qt5
  • qt5-devel
  • qt5-libs-debug
  • qtwebkit-qt5-devel
  • qtwebkit-qt5-libs-debug
  • qwt-devel-qt5
  • sip-qt5
  • spatialite
  • oci
  • qtkeychain

QGIS

To start this last step, we have to create a file C:\OSGeo4W\OSGeo4W-dev.bat containing something like:

@echo off 
set OSGEO4W_ROOT=C:\OSGeo4W64
call "%OSGEO4W_ROOT%\bin\o4w_env.bat" 
call "%OSGEO4W_ROOT%\bin\qt5_env.bat" 
call "%OSGEO4W_ROOT%\bin\py3_env.bat" 
set VS140COMNTOOLS=%PROGRAMFILES(x86)%\Microsoft Visual Studio 14.0\Common7\Tools\ 
call "%PROGRAMFILES(x86)%\Microsoft Visual Studio 14.0\VC\vcvarsall.bat" amd64 
set INCLUDE=%INCLUDE%;%PROGRAMFILES(x86)%\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v7.1A\include 
set LIB=%LIB%;%PROGRAMFILES(x86)%\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v7.1A\lib 
path %PATH%;%PROGRAMFILES%\CMake\bin;c:\cygwin\bin 
@set GRASS_PREFIX="%OSGEO4W_ROOT%\apps\grass\grass-7.2.1 
@set INCLUDE=%INCLUDE%;%OSGEO4W_ROOT%\include 
@set LIB=%LIB%;%OSGEO4W_ROOT%\lib;%OSGEO4W_ROOT%\lib 

@cmd 

According to your environment, some variables should probably be adapted. Then in the Cygwin terminal:

$ cd C:\
$ git clone git://github.com/qgis/QGIS.git
$ ./OSGeo4W-dev.bat
> cd QGIS/ms-windows/osgeo4w

In this directory, you have to edit the file package-nightly.cmd to replace:

cmake -G Ninja ^

by:

cmake -G "Visual Studio 14 2015 Win64" ^

Moreover, we had to update the environment variable SETUAPI_LIBRARY according to the current position of the Windows Kits file SetupAPI.Lib:

set SETUPAPI_LIBRARY=C:\Program Files (x86)\Windows Kits\8.1\Lib\winv6.3\um\x64\SetupAPI.Lib

And finally, we just have to compile with the next command:

> package-nightly.cmd 2.99.0 1 qgis-dev x86_64

Victory!

And see you soon for the generation of OSGEO4W packages 😉

Source

https://github.com/qgis/QGIS/blob/ab859c9bdf8a529df9805ff54e7250921a74d877/doc/msvc.t2t

 

 

PostgreSQL backend sollution for quality assurance and data archiving

Did you know that the possibilities to make a full QGIS backend solution for quality assurance and archiving in PostgreSQL are immense? SQL has it’s well known limitations, but with enough creativity you could create quite nice solutions just using

Data exploration with Data Plotly for QGIS3

Data Plotly is a new plugin by Matteo Ghetta for QGIS3 which makes it possible to draw D3 graphs of vector layer attribute values. This is a huge step towards making QGIS a one stop shop for data exploration!

Data Plotly adds a new panel where graphs can be configured and viewed. Currently, there are nine different plot types:

The following examples use tree cadastre data from the city of Linz, Austria.

Scatter plots with both two and three variables are supported. After picking the attributes you want to visualize, press “Create plot”.

If you change some settings and press “Create plot” again, by default, the new graph will be plotted on top of the old one. If you don’t want that to happen, press “Clean plot canvas” before creating a new plot.

The plots are interactive and display more information on mouse over, for example, the values of a box plot:

Even aggregate expressions are supported! Here’s the mean height of trees by type (deciduous L or coniferous N):

For more examples, I strongly recommend to have a look at the plugin home page.

Documentation for QGIS 3.0 – call for contributions!

Dear QGIS users, enthusiasts and fine people out there. QGIS 3.0 is coming very soon….we are in a ‘soft freeze’ state at the moment while we wait for some critical last pieces of code to get finalised. Then we go into hard freeze and prepare to roll out our next major release. Those of you that have been playing with the ‘2.99’ builds will surely have noticed that QGIS 3.0 is going to feature a huge number of improvements and new features – both in the user interface and in the API and code internals.

Screen Shot 2017-12-03 at 23.05.34

But we have a BIG problem:
we need your help to document and describe all those fine new features!

Yes fine reader now is the time to break out of the ‘passive user of QGIS’ mould you might find yourself in and lend a hand. We have an issue tracker with an issue for each of the new features that has landed in QGIS 3.0. Even if you do not know how to use our Sphinx based documentation system, you can help tremendously by preparing the prose that should be used to describe new features and attaching it to the issue list linked to above. If you do that, the documentation team can do more editorial work and less  ‘writing from scratch’ work.

Writing documentation is a brilliant way to enhance your own knowledge of QGIS and learn the new features that are coming in the next release. For those starting out with documentation there are issue reports that are tagged “easy” to lower the barrier for beginners. If you are an existing documentation team member it would be great if you could review the list and check whether there are more issues that can be tagged as “easy”.

The issue list is automatically created whenever a developer commits a change to QGIS with the word ‘FEATURE’ in their change notes. In some cases the change may not be something that an end user will be able to see – so it will be great for volunteers to also review the automatically added issues and close off any that are not relevant for documentation.

Other features are quite complex and in some cases could benefit from interaction with the original developer to make sure that the nuances of the new features are properly described. We need documentation writers to follow these thread and present the new functionality in a clear and concise way.

There are some very helpful resources for people just getting started with QGIS documentation. You can read the documentation for contributors. You can also contact the team via the community mailing list for specific help if the contributor docs don’t provide the information you need.

If you want to see the QGIS Documentation up-to-date for the version 3.0 release, please do get involved and help Yves Jacolin and the documentation team!

Lastly if you are not able to directly contribute to the documentation, consider funding QGIS – we have a budget for documentation improvements.

We look forward to your support and contributions!

 

Tim Sutton (QGIS Project Chairman)

 

 

 

 


Building QGIS master with Qt 5.9.3 debug build

Building QGIS from sources is not hard at all on a recent linux box, but what about if you wanted to be able to step-debug into Qt core or if you wanted to build QGIS agains the latest Qt release?

Here things become tricky.

This short post is about my experiments to build Qt and and other Qt-based dependencies for QGIS in order to get a complete debugger-friendly build of QGIS.

 

Start with downloading the latest Qt installer from Qt official website: https://www.qt.io/download-qt-for-application-development choose the Open Source version.

 

Now install the Qt version you want to build, make sure you check the Sources and the components you might need.

Whe you are done with that, you’ll have your sources in a location like /home/user/Qt/5.9.3/Src/

To build the sources, you can change into that directory and issue the following command – I assume that you have already installed all the dependencies normally needed to build C++ Qt programs – I’m using clang here but feel free to choose gcc, we are going to install the new Qt build into /opt/qt593.

./configure -prefix /opt/qt593 -debug -opensource -confirm-license -ccache -platform linux-clang

When done, you can build it with

make -j9
sudo make install

 

To build QGIS you also need three additional Qt packages

 

QtWebKit from https://github.com/qt/qtwebkit (you can just download the zip):

Extract it somewhere and build it with

/opt/qt593/bin/qmake WebKit.pro
make -j9
sudo make install

 

Same with QScintila2 from https://www.riverbankcomputing.com/software/qscintilla

/opt/qt593/bin/qmake qscintilla.pro
make -j9
sudo make install

 

QWT is also needed and it can be downloaded from https://sourceforge.net/projects/qwt/files/qwt/6.1.3/ but it requires a small edit in
qwtconfig.pri before you can build it: set QWT_INSTALL_PREFIX = /opt/qt593_libs/qwt-6.1.3 to install it in a different folder than the default one (that would possibly overwrite a system install of QWT).

The build it with:

/opt/qt593/bin/qmake qwt.pro
make -j9
sudo make install

 

If everything went fine, you can now configure Qt Creator to use this new debug build of Qt:

start with creating a new kit (you can probably clone a working Qt5 kit if you have one).

What you need to change is the Qt version (the path to cmake) to point to your brand new Qt build,:

Pick up a name and choose the Qt version, but before doing that you need to click on Manage… to create a new one:

Now you should be able to build QGIS using your new Qt build, just make sure you disable the bindings in the CMake configuration: unfortunately you’d also need to build PyQt in order to create the bindings.

 

Whe QGIS is built using this debug-enabled Qt, you will be able to step-debug into Qt core libraries!

Happy debugging!

 

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