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QGIS Planet

Win a QField jump-start package, use #MyQField

Do you want to win a QField jump-start package worth 550€?

We are launching the #MyQField challenge. Follow us on Twitter and show us how you use @QFieldForQGIS by tagging your tweets with #MyQField and #dataisoutside. The tweet with most likes and retweets by 24.4.19 wins the training!

Rules

Fine boring prints:

  • Recourse to the courts is not permitted
  • There will be no correspondence regarding the competition
  • No cash payouts can be made
  • Participants have no enforceable claims to the transfer, payment or exchange of winnings

New Year’s present – QField 1.0 RC1

It was a long and winding road but we are very excited to announce the general availability of QField 1.0 Release Candidate 1.

Packed with loads of useful features like online and offline features digitizing, geometry and attributes editing, attribute search, powerful forms, theme switching, GPS support, camera integration and much more, QField is the powerful tool for those who need to edit on the go and would like to avoid standing in the swamp with a laptop or paper charts.

With a slick user interface, QField allows using QGIS projects on tablets and mobile devices. Thanks to the QGIS rendering engine, the map-results are identical and come with the full range of styling possibilities available on the desktop.

We ask you to help us test as much as possible this Release Candidate so that we can iron out as many bugs as possible before the final release of QField 1.0.

You can easily install QField using the playstore (http://qfield.org/get), find out more on the documentation site (http://qfield.org) and report problems to our issues tracking system (http://qfield.org/issues)

QField, like QGIS, is an open source project. Everyone is welcome to contribute to make the product even better – whether it is with financial support, enthusiastic programming, translation and documentation work or visionary ideas.

If you want to help us build a better QField or QGIS, or need any services related to the whole QGIS stack don’t hesitate to contact us.

QField 1.0 is here

Let’s get straight to the point

It’s official, QField for QGIS 1.0 is out!

Get it while it’s hot on the Playstore (qfield.org/get) or on GitHub

We are incredibly pleased and proud of just having released such a jewel and are convinced that, thanks to all its features and conscious design choices, QField will make your field digitizing work much more efficient and pleasant.

Packed with loads of useful features like online and offline features digitizing, geometry and attributes editing, attribute search, powerful forms, theme switching, GPS support, camera integration and much more, QField is the powerful tool for those who need to edit on the go and would like to avoid standing in the swamp with a laptop or paper charts.

Let’s see what makes QField probably* the best mobile GIS in the world.

Work efficiently

QField focuses on efficiently getting GIS field work done and combines a minimal design with sophisticated technology to get data from the field to the office in a comfortable and easy way.

Fast and reactive

Thanks to the underlying QGIS engine and a lot of optimizations, QField is powerful and snappy. Even with complex projects, QField is a joy to work with.

Easy handling

Conscious design choices and a continuous focus on a minimal user interface drive QField’s development. This allows us to deliver a product wich is uncluttered and extremly user-friendly

Quickly digitise

Allowing a seamless digitizing experience is a paramount goal of QField. Thanks to a cleverly designed adaptive user interface and specific features like real-time attribute checks and snapping support, QField allows its users to be extremely time efficient.

Unmatched feature set

To be the best, you need to be clever but also skillful.

QField’s efficiency is matched only by its featureset that allows its users to make the most out of their fieldwork time.

Powerful cartography combined with full text search

The beauty of GIS is that maps are dynamic. Layers can individually be shown and hidden and information can be presented more or less prominently based on the task at hand. QField supports the endless styling possibilities offered by QGIS and thanks to a well placed theme switcher you can change the looks of the entire project with a single click. For even more customizability, QField allows hiding and showing layers by simply long-pressing on the layer name.

Furthermore, QField boasts a fully configurable attribute text search that will allow you to geolocate and edit that exact object you were looking for.

Geometry editing

Editing Geometries on the field is probably the most complex task an operator has to deal with. QField simplifies this process through an adaptive toolbar that appears only when necessary, snapping support and a crosshair digitizer.

Thanks to these enhancements, QField allows reducing the error rate significantly.

Support for high precision GNSS

Simple internal GPS accuracy might be enough for basic projects but cadastral surveying and other high accuracy digitizations have much higher requirements. QFields natively listens to the Android location services so it can take advantage of the best location provided by external devices.

Generate PDF

Thanks to QField’s native support for generating PDFs based on QGIS’s print layouts, your on the fly daily report map is just one click away.

Intuitive project chooser

When dealing with multiple projects, quickly being able to switch between them is key. QField comes with a beautiful file selector with favorite directories (long press on a folder to add it to the favorites and long press on the favorites list to remove it) and an automatic list of the last three opened projects that will save you heaps of time while looking for your projects.

Your data – Your decisions

QField does not impose any constraint on the data model, it is your data and you decide what they should look like and what values are acceptable. QField can enforce constraints for you and you can choose among various type of widgets to represent your data. QGIS will preconfigure some field types automatically, all you’ll have then to do is tweak the settings if you want and your project is ready for mobile prime time. Our documentation has all the information you need.

Extends your Geo Data Infrastructure seamlessly

QField uses QGIS to set up maps and forms so it automatically supports a wide variety of data formats. Thanks to this, you can comfortably prepare your project once and then deploy it everywhere. And since QGIS also has a server component, your project can be served on a WebGIS with the very same beautiful looks.

In fact you can see this exact infrastructure up and running under demo.qfield.org and with the “online_survey.qgs” project included in the QField demo projects.

Synchronize with WiFi, Cable or Network

You can synchronize your project and data (in case you are not using a centralized online database) using various methods thanks to our QFieldSync plugin.

Future cloud integration

In the near future we will add a cloud synchronization functionality, so that you will be able to seamlessly manage your project online and have them automatically deployed to your devices.

Installing and contributing

You can easily install QField using the Playstore (qfield.org/get), find out more on the documentation site (qfield.org), watch some demo videos on our channel (qfield.org/demo) and report problems to our issues tracking system (qfield.org/issues). Please note that the Playstore update can take some hours to roll out and if you had installed a version directly from GitHub, you might have to uninstall it to get the latest Playstore update.

QField, like QGIS, is an open source project. Everyone is welcome to contribute to making the product even better – whether it is with financial support, translation, documentation work, enthusiastic programming or visionary ideas.

We would like to thank our fantastic community for all the great translations, documentations, bug reports and general feedback they gave us. Thanks to all this, we were able to fix plenty of bugs, address performance issues and even add some super cool new features.

Development and deployment services

As masterminds behind QField and core contributor to QGIS, we are the perfect partner for your project. If you want to help us build a better QField or QGIS, or if you need any services related to the whole QGIS stack, don’t hesitate to contact us.

OPENGIS.ch

OPENGIS.ch helps you setting up your spatial data infrastructure based on seamlessly integrated desktop, web, and mobile components.
We support your team in planning, developing, deploying and running your infrastructure. Thanks to several senior geodata infrastructure experts, QGIS core developers and the makers of the mobile data acquisition solution QField, OPENGIS.ch has all it takes to make your project a success. OPENGIS.ch is known for its commitment to high-quality products and its continuous efforts to improve the open source ecosystem.

* We might be biased, but we do believe it

QGIS on the road

We are extremely pleased to announce the QGIS on the road tour with three free events this spring all over Switzerland. Limited places available so act fast reserve your place for the location you want.

Telling the story of Ms Maya Mielina, a retired GIS analyst and passionate beekeeper, our QGIS experts will show you features that you might not even have imagined existed in QGIS and that will allow you to dramatically increase your efficiency.

The format of the event is not that of a classic workshop but rather a prolonged presentation of extremely useful features. To keep the presentation interesting we will not focus on details or give a step by step tutorial, instead, will give you the gist of the idea thanks to our videos.

We advise you to take notes and to rewatch the published videos after the event.

QField RC5 – Last call for testing

We are really happy to announce the fifth and (hopefully) last 1.0 release candidate in QField’s history! This means that QField 1.0 is closer than ever.

Get it while it’s hot on the Playstore (https://qfield.org/get) or on GitHub

Thanks to all the feedback by the fantastic community we were able to fix plenty of bugs, address performance issues and even add some super cool new features.

New file selector

Among the new features, the most important is the flashy new file selector with favorite directories (long press on a folder to add it to the favorites and longpress on the favorites list to remove it) and an automatic list of the last three opened projects that will save you heaps of time while looking for your projects.

Another lifesaver is the newly added support for pasting text from the clipboard in the search bar. Finally, we added a smart and unobtrusive “rate this app” dialog to make it easier for you to give QField the ★★★★★ you always wanted to give it 🙂

Search functionality

List of improvements since RC3

  • New Custom file selector (#476)
  • Favorite directories in file selector (#507)
  • Recent projects in file selector (#499)
  • Ripple effect in file selector (#505)
  • Smart unobtrusive “rate this app” dialog (#510)
  • clear value in date/time if invalid when losing focus (#464)
  • fix crash when switching layer (#498)
  • Respect DPI in multiline fontsize
  • Value Map compatibility with QGIS 2 and lazy loading for performance improvements
  • Use external valuemap model
  • allow to copy text from clipboard in search bar
  • respect keep scale option in locator
  • optimize scale when searching points (#472)
  • add frame to search results
  • Update to Qt 5.12.1 (for android 6+)

You can easily install QField using the Playstore (https://qfield.org/get), find out more on the documentation site (https://qfield.org), watch some demo videos on our channel (https://qfield.org/demo) and report problems to our issues tracking system (https://qfield.org/issues). Please note that the Playstore update can take some hours to roll out and if you had installed a version directly from GitHub, you might have to uninstall it to get the latest playstore update.

QField, like QGIS, is an open source project. Everyone is welcome to contribute making the product even better – whether it is with financial support, enthusiastic programming, translation and documentation work or visionary ideas.

If you want to help us build a better QField or QGIS, or need any services related to the whole QGIS stack don’t hesitate to contact us.

You gave us feedback – we give you QField 1.0 RC3

We are really happy to announce the release a new great milestone in QField’s history, QField 1.0 Release Candidate 3! (Yes, you might have got a glimpse of the broken RC2 if you where very attentive)

Thanks to the great feedback we received since releasing RC1 we were able to fix plenty of issues and add some more goodies.

We would like to invite everybody to install this Release Candidate and help us test it as much as possible so that we can iron out as many bugs as possible before the final release of QField 1.0.

List of fixes since RC1:
• fixed bad synchronization / geopackage files not written) (PR #455)
• fix glitches in portrait mode (PR #423 and #439)
• fix highlighting of points (search and feature selection) (PR #443)
• fix GPS info window overlapping search icon (PR #438)
• redesign of scale bar (PR #438)
• fix crash in feature form (with invalid relations) (PR #440)
• fix date/time field editing (PR #421 and #458)
• fix project not loading the correct map theme (fix #459)
• fix QGS or QGZ does not exist (PR #453)

Unfortunately, due to necessary updates in the SDK we target, we had to drop support for Android 4.4. The minimum Android requirement as of this RC is Android 5.0 (SDK version 21).

In case playstore does not suggest an update to QField Lucendro 0.11.90, the last working version for Android 4.4, we suggest all Android 4.4 users to uninstall QField 1.0 RC 1 (which was broken on android 4.4) and reinstall QField from the store. This way you should get If you don’t use play store, you can find all QField releases under https://qfield.org/releases

You can easily install QField using the playstore (https://qfield.org/get), find out more on the documentation site (https://qfield.org) and report problems to our issues tracking system (https://qfield.org/issues)

QField, like QGIS, is an open source project. Everyone is welcome to contribute to make the product even better – whether it is with financial support, enthusiastic programming, translation and documentation work or visionary ideas.

If you want to help us build a better QField or QGIS, or need any services related to the whole QGIS stack don’t hesitate to contact us.

Who is behind QGIS at Oslandia ?

You are using QGIS and look for support services to improve your experience and solve problems ? Oslandia is here to help you with our full QGIS editor service range ! Discover our team members below.

You will probably interact first with our pre-sales engineer Bertrand Parpoil. He leads Geographical Information System projects for 15 years for large corporations, public administrations or hi-tech SME. Bertrand will listen to your needs and explore your use cases, to offer you the best set of services.

Régis Haubourg also takes part in the first steps of projects to analyze your usages and improve them. GIS Expert, he knows QGIS by heart and will make the most of its capabilities. As QGIS Community Manager at Oslandia, he is very active in the QGIS community of developers and contributors. He is president of the Francophone OSGeo local chapter ( OSGeo-fr ), QGIS voting member, organizes the French QGIS day conference in Montpellier, and participates to QGIS community meetings. Before joining Oslandia, he led the migration to QGIS and PostGIS at the Adour-Garonne Water Agency, and now guides our clients with their GIS migrations to OpenSource solutions. Régis is also a great asset when working on water, hydrology and other specific thematic subjects.

Loïc Bartoletti develops QGIS, specializing in features corresponding to his fields of interests : network management, topography, urbanism, architecture… We find him contributing to advanced vector editing in QGIS, writing Python plugins, namely for DICT management. Pushing CAD and migrations from CAD tools to GIS and QGIS is one of his major goals. He will develop your custom applications, combining technical expertise and functional competences. When bored, Loïc packages software on FreeBSD.

Vincent Mora is senior developer in Python and C++, as well as PostGIS expert. He has a strong experience in numerical simulation. He likes coupling GIS (PostGIS, QGIS) with 3D numerical computing for risk management or production optimization. Vincent is an official QGIS committer and can directly integrate your needs into the core of the software. He is also GDAL committer and optimizes low-level layers of your applications. Among numerous activities, Vincent serves as lead developer of the development team for Hydra Software, a tool dedicated to unified hydraulics and hydrology modelling and simulation based on QGIS.

Hugo Mercier is an officiel QGIS committer too for several years. He regularly talks in international conferences on PostGIS, QGIS and other OpenSource GIS softwares. He will implement your needs with new QGIS features, develop innovative plugins ( like QGeoloGIS ) and design and build your new custom applications, solving all kind of technological challenges.

Paul Blottière completes our QGIS committers : very active on core development, Paul has refactored the QGIS server component to bring it to an industry-grade quality level. He also designed and implemented the infrastructure allowing to guarantee QGIS server performances. He dedicated himself to QGIS server OGC certification, especially for WMS (1.3). Thanks to this work QGIS is now a reference OGC implementation.

Julien Cabièces recently joined Oslandia, and quickly dived into QGIS : he contributes to the core of this Desktop GIS, on the server component, as well as applications linked to numerical simulation. Coming from a satellite imagery company with industrial applications, he uses his flexibility to answer all your needs. He brings quality and professionalism to your projects, minimizing risks for large production deployments.

You may also meet Vincent Picavet. Oslandia’s founder is a QGIS.org voting member, and is involved in the project’s evolution and the organization of the community.

Aside from these core contributors, all other Oslandia members also master QGIS integrate this tool into their day-to-day projects.

Bertrand, Régis, Loïc, Vincent (x2), Hugo, Paul et Julien are in tune with you and will be happy to work together for your migrations, application development, and all your desires to contribute to the QGIS ecosystem. Do not hesitate to contact us !

Funding for selective masking in QGIS is now complete!

Few months ago, Oslandia launched QGIS lab’s , a place to advertise our new ideas for QGIS, but also a place to help you find co funders to make dreams become reality.

The first initiative is about label selective masking, a feature that will allow us to achieve even more professional rendering for our maps.

Selective masking

 

Thanks to the commitment of the Swiss QGIS user group and local authorities, this work is now funded !

We now can start working hard to deliver you this great feature for QGIS 3.10

Thanks again to our funders

A last word, this is not a classical crowd funding initiative, but a classical contract for each funder.

No more reason not to contribute to free and open source software!

QGIS Print Layouts Graphs and Charts — target reached!

We’ve just passed the extended deadline for our recent QGIS Print Layouts Graphs and Charts campaign, and the great news is that thanks to a large number of generous backers we’ve successfully hit the target for this campaign! This has only been possible thanks to the tireless work of the QGIS community and user groups in promoting this campaign and spreading the word.

The Print Layouts Graphs and Charts campaign is a joint effort with our friends at Faunalia, so we’ll soon be starting work together on all the wonderful new functionality heading to the QGIS DataPlotly plugin as a result. The work will be commencing late June, just after the QGIS 3.8.0 final release. Keep an eye out for further updates on the development from this time! You can read more about what’s coming in detail at the campaign page.

We’d like to take this opportunity to extend our heartfelt thanks to all the backers who have pledged to support this project:

  • Federico Gianoli
  • Papercraft Mountains
  • Liam McCrae
  • Henry Walshaw
  • Raúl Sangonzalo
  • Ferdinando Urbano
  • pitsch-ing.ch
  • Carbon-X
  • Gabriel Diosan
  • Rene Giovanni Borella
  • Enrico Bertonati
  • Guido Ingwer
  • David Addy
  • Gerd Jünger
  • Andreas Neumann
  • Stefano Campus
  • Michael Jabot
  • Korto
  • Enrico Ferreguti
  • Carlo A. Nicolini
  • Salvatore Fiandaca
  • Alberto Grava
  • Hans van der Kwast
  • Ben Hur Pintor
  • Silvio Grosso
  • Nobusuke Iwasaki
  • Alasdair Rae
  • Manori Senanayake
  • Canton de Neuchâtel
  • Matthias Daues
  • Alteri Seculo
  • SunGIS Ltd.
  • Stu Smith
  • Keolis Rennes
  • Gabriel Diosan
  • Aiden Price
  • Giacomo Ponticelli
  • Diane Fritz
  • Gemio Bissolati
  • Claire Birnie
  • Nicolas Roelandt
  • Rocco Pispico
  • Gabriel Bengtsson
  • Birds Eye View
  • Barend Köbben
  • Roberto Marzocchi (GTER)
  • Yoichi Kayama
  • Alessandro Sarretta
  • Luca Angeli
  • Luca Bellani
  • giswelt
  • Stefan Giese
  • Ben Harding
  • Joao Gaspar
  • Romain Lacroix
  • Ryan Cooper
  • Daniele Bonaposta
  • QGIS Swedish User Group
  • Nino Formica
  • Michael Gieding
  • Amedeo Fadini
  • Andrew Hannell
  • Stefano
  • Phil Wyatt
  • Brett Edmond Carlock
  • Transitec

 

Using QGIS from Conda

QGIS recipes have been available on Conda for a while, but now, that they work for the three main operating systems, getting QGIS from Conda is s starting to become a reliable alternative to other QGIS distributions. Anyway, let’s rewind a bit…

What is Conda?

Conda is an open source package management system and environment management system that runs on Windows, macOS and Linux. Conda quickly installs, runs and updates packages and their dependencies. Conda easily creates, saves, loads and switches between environments on your local computer. It was created for Python programs, but it can package and distribute software for any language.

Why is that of any relevance?

Conda provides a similar way to build, package and install QGIS (or any other software) in Linux, Windows, and Mac.

As a user, it’s the installation part that I enjoy the most. I am a Linux user, and one of the significant limitations is not having an easy way to install more than one version of QGIS on my machine (for example the latest stable version and the Long Term Release). I was able to work around that limitation by compiling QGIS myself, but with Conda, I can install as many versions as I want in a very convenient way.

The following paragraphs explain how to install QGIS using Conda. The instructions and Conda commands should be quite similar for all the operating systems.

Anaconda or miniconda?

First thing you need to do is to install the Conda packaging system. Two distributions install Conda: Anaconda and Miniconda.

TL;DR Anaconda is big (3Gb?) and installs the packaging system and a lot of useful tools, python packages, libraries, etc… . Miniconda is much smaller and installs just the packaging system, which is the bare minimum that you need to work with Conda and will allow you to selectively install the tools and packages you need. I prefer the later.

For more information, check this stack exchange answer on anaconda vs miniconda.

Download anaconda or miniconda installers for your system and follow the instructions to install it.

Windows installer is an executable, you should run it as administrator. The OSX and Linux installers are bash scripts, which means that, once downloaded, you need to run something like this to install:

bash Miniconda3-latest-Linux-x86_64.sh

Installing QGIS

Notice that the Conda tools are used in a command line terminal. Besides, on Windows, you need to use the command prompt that is installed with miniconda.

Using environments

Conda works with environments, which are similar to Python virtual environments but not limited only to python. Basically, it allows isolating different installations or setups without interfering with the rest of the system. I recommend that you always use environments. If, like me, you want to have more that one version of QGIS installed, then the use of environments is mandatory.

Creating an environment is as easy as entering the following command on the terminal:

conda create --name <name_of_the_environment>

For example,

conda create --name qgis_stable

To use an environment, you need to activate it.

conda activate qgis_stable

Your terminal prompt will show you the active environment.

(qgis_stable) aneto@oryx:~/miniconda3$

To deactivate the current environment, you run

conda deactivate

Installing packages

Installing packages using Conda is as simples as:

conda install <package_name>

Because conda packages can be stored in different channels, and because the default channels (from the anaconda service) do not contain QGIS, we need to specify the channel we want to get the package from. conda-forge is a community-driven repository of conda recipes and includes updated QGIS packages.

conda install qgis --channel conda-forge

Conda will download the latest available version of QGIS and all its dependencies installing it on the active environment.

Note: Because conda always try to install the latest version, if you want to use the QGIS LTR version, you must specify the QGIS version.

conda install qgis=3.4.8 --channel conda-forge

Uninstalling packages

Uninstalling QGIS is also easy. The quickest option is to delete the entire environment where QGIS was installed. Make sure you deactivate it first.

conda deactivate
conda env remove --name qgis_stable

Another option is to remove QGIS package manually. This is useful if you have other packages installed that you want to keep.

conda activate qgis_stable
conda remove qgis -c conda-forge

This only removes the QGIS package and will leave all other packages that were installed with it. Note that you need to specify the conda-forge channel. Otherwise, Conda will try to update some packages from the default channels during the removal process, and things may get messy.

Running QGIS

To run QGIS, in the terminal, activate the environment (if not activated already) and run the qgis command

conda activate qgis_stable
qgis

Some notes and caveats

Please be aware that QGIS packages on Conda do not provide the same level of user experience as the official Linux, Windows, and Mac packages from the QGIS.org distribution. For example, there are no desktop icons, and file association. It does not include GRASS and SAGA, etc …

On the other hand, QGIS installations on Conda it will share user configurations, installed plugins, with any other QGIs installations on your system.

(Nederlands) QGIS op de FOSS4GNL 2019 (20 juni in Delft)

Sorry, this entry is only available in the Dutch language

Movement data in GIS #23: trajectories in context

Today’s post continues where “Why you should be using PostGIS trajectories” leaves off. It’s the result of a collaboration with Eva Westermeier. I had the pleasure to supervise her internship at AIT last year and also co-supervised her Master’s thesis [0] on the topic of enriching trajectories with information about their geographic context.

Context-aware analysis of movement data is crucial for different domains and applications, from transport to ecology. While there is a wealth of data, efficient and user-friendly contextual trajectory analysis is still hampered by a lack of appropriate conceptual approaches and practical methods. (Westermeier, 2018)

Part of the work was focused on evaluating different approaches to adding context information from vector datasets to trajectories in PostGIS. For example, adding land cover context to animal movement data or adding information on anchoring and harbor areas to vessel movement data.

Classic point-based model vs. line-based model

The obvious approach is to intersect the trajectory points with context data. This is the classic point data model of contextual trajectories. It’s straightforward to add context information in the point-based model but it also generates large numbers of repeating annotations. In contrast, the line data model using, for example, PostGIS trajectories (LinestringM) is more compact since trajectories can be split into segments at context borders. This creates one annotation per segment and the individual segments are convenient to analyze (as described in part #12).

Spatio-temporal interpolation as provided by the line data model offers additional advantages for the analysis of annotated segments. Contextual segments start and end at the intersection of the trajectory linestring with context polygon borders. This means that there are no gaps like in the point-based model. Consequently, while the point-based model systematically underestimates segment length and duration, the line-based approach offers more meaningful segment length and duration measurements.

Schematic illustration of a subset of an annotated trajectory in two context classes, a) systematic underestimation of length or duration in the point data model, b) full length or duration between context polygon borders in the line data model (source: Westermeier (2018))

Another issue of the point data model is that brief context changes may be missed or represented by just one point location. This makes it impossible to compute the length or duration of the respective context segment. (Of course, depending on the application, it can be desirable to ignore brief context changes and make the annotation process robust towards irrelevant changes.)

Schematic illustration of context annotation for brief context changes, a) and b)
two variants for the point data model, c) gapless annotation in the line data model (source: Westermeier (2018) based on Buchin et al. (2014))

Beyond annotations, context can also be considered directly in an analysis, for example, when computing distances between trajectories and contextual point objects. In this case, the point-based approach systematically overestimates the distances.

Schematic illustration of distance measurement from a trajectory to an external
object, a) point data model, b) line data model (source: Westermeier (2018))

The above examples show that there are some good reasons to dump the classic point-based model. However, the line-based model is not without its own issues.

Issues

Computing the context annotations for trajectory segments is tricky. The main issue is that ST_Intersection drops the M values. This effectively destroys our trajectories! There are ways to deal with this issue – and the corresponding SQL queries are published in the thesis (p. 38-40) – but it’s a real bummer. Basically, ST_Intersection only provides geometric output. Therefore, we need to reconstruct the temporal information in order to create usable trajectory segments.

Finally, while the line-based model is well suited to add context from other vector data, it is less useful for context data from continuous rasters but that was beyond the scope of this work.

Conclusion

After the promising results of my initial investigations into PostGIS trajectories, I was optimistic that context annotations would be a straightforward add-on. The line-based approach has multiple advantages when it comes to analyzing contextual segments. Unfortunately, generating these contextual segments is much less convenient and also slower than I had hoped. Originally, I had planned to turn this work into a plugin for the Processing toolbox but the results of this work motivated me to look into other solutions. You’ve already seen some of the outcomes in part #20 “Trajectools v1 released!”.

References

[0] Westermeier, E.M. (2018). Contextual Trajectory Modeling and Analysis. Master Thesis, Interfaculty Department of Geoinformatics, University of Salzburg.


This post is part of a series. Read more about movement data in GIS.

Presentations at FOSS4G 2015 in Seoul

Slides from our presentations at FOSS4G 2015 in Seoul: Keynote: The QGIS project and its evolution from a desktop GIS to a GIS platform - Slides New QGIS functions for power users - Slides QGIS Plugins - From Must-Haves to insider tips - Slides Building an OpenLayers 3 map viewer with React - Slides Thanks to the organizers of this great conference! It was a pleasure to get in contact with so many users from around the world.

Sourcepole at FOSS4G 2014 in Portland

In one week, the 2014 FOSS4G Conference will start in Portland/Oregon. Sourcepole supports this major event as a bronze sponsor. Our conference contributions: Workshop presented by Horst Düster (@moazagotl) Tuesday afternoon: QGIS Plugin Development with PyQt4 and PyQGIS Presentations by Pirmin Kalberer ((@implgeo)) Thursday, Session 2, Track 7, 13:00 - 13:25: State of QGIS Server Thursday, Session 2, Track 7, 13:30 - 13:55: From Nottingham to PDX: QGIS 2014 roundup Thursday, Session 3, Track 6, 16:25 - 13:25: Easy ETL with OGR Meet Pirmin and Horst at Sourcepole’s exhibition booth and have a look at our latest products.

NTv2 transformations with QGIS

Datum transformations with grid shift files are used in several countries to convert coordinates between different datums. In Switzerland, datum transformation using the NTv2 method is important because of the upcoming conversion between the LV03 system and the new LV95 system. Up to now, doing coordinate transformations with grid shift files was possible in QGIS, but unconvenient. To use an NTv2 transformation in QGIS, the grid shift file needs to be placed in a directory where proj4 can find it (usually /usr/share/proj on Linux and OSGeo4W\share\proj on Windows).

Publish Image Tooltips with QGIS Cloud

A lot of people are using QGIS Cloud as a service with ready to use QGIS webclient. It’s very easy to publish data and share maps in this way. Publishing of georeferenced images can be done with QGIS Cloud in a few steps as well. But the main problems are: how to upload the images into the cloud database? how to manage them? how to display the results? QGIS and QGIS Cloud are offering all tools for this task.

AGIT 2013: QGIS Cloud - Karten einfach ins Netz

Noch nie war es so einfach individuelle Web Map Services mit ansprechenden Karten, Geodatenbank und Web Client zu erstellen, wie mit QGIS Cloud. Der am 5. Juli an der AGIT 2013 in Salzburg präsentierte Vortrag kann hier herunter geladen werden. Präsentation

FOSSGIS 2019 in Dresden

Sourcepole war an der FOSSGIS 2019 in Dresden als Austeller, mit Vorträgen und einem Vektor Tile Workshop präsent.

QGIS Instant Print Plugin

As a side product of a customer project, we’re publishing a QGIS plugin for printing maps to a file with just two mouse clicks.

QGIS Cloud - Speed up the loading time of the web client

QGIS Cloud is your personal geo-data infrastructure in the internet. Publish maps and data. Share geo-information with others. And all of this very easily, without server, infrastructure and expert knowledge. If you know QGIS Desktop, then you know QGIS cloud just as well. Just install the QGIS cloud plugin from the official QGIS plugin repository and you’re good to go. You can publish as many maps as you want. But the default settings of QGIS projects you like to publish via QGIS Cloud are not the best with respect to the performance of the QGIS Webclient / WMS.

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