QGIS Planet

3rd Crowdfunding on Point Clouds, Elevation Profiles and 3D Map View Enhancements

Lutra Consulting, North Road and Hobu are collaborating in a new crowd-funding campaign to extend these capabilities in future QGIS releases!

Highlights of the planned improvements include:

  • Point Clouds
    Creating point cloud processing tools for transformation, management and analysis of point clouds. Ensuring that extremely large (terabyte size) datasets can be handled well for both display and analysis.
  • Elevation Profiles
    Support embedding customisable elevation profiles into print layouts and atlases, and allow exporting elevation profiles to CSV and DXF.
  • 3D Maps
    Faster 3D maps for large scenes, an improved 3D measurement tool and further improvements to 3D scene navigation.

Your financial support is vital to make these improvements possible! Visit the crowd funding page for additional information on what is included in the effort and how you can financially contribute.

QGIS Annual General Meeting – 2022

Dear QGIS Community,

We recently held our 2022 QGIS Annual General Meeting. The minutes of this meeting are available for all to view.

I would like to welcome our new QGIS PSC member: Régis Haubourg. Régis has been a geomatics enthusiast for years and started deploying and funding QGIS development in 2008 as a GIS and database administrator for a water basin agency.

From 2016 to 2021, he worked for Oslandia mainly on QGIS, learned “the developer’s” side of things and could professionally collaborate with other great contributors to the project. Régis has been promoting the QGIS in the french User group, organizing 4 QGIS french user days, and being the local chapter chair for 2 years. Since 2022, he has worked for a scientific institute promoting greener construction and retrofitting methods to fight against climate change. Welcome! We’re very excited to start working with you!

I’d like to take a moment to deeply thank Paolo Cavallini for all his work in QGIS and in the QGIS PSC.

Paolo got involved in QGIS very long ago, first as a user, then more and more deeply in various activities, initiating and supporting various plugins and core functions (e.g. GDAL Tools, DB Manager), opening and managing bugs, taking care of GRASS modules, handling the trademark registration, etc. Paolo also acted as Finance and Marketing Advisor for several years before taking over the plugin approval process.

Between 2018 and 2020 Paolo served as PSC chair helping QGIS rapidly evolve into a more and more professional project. In 2020 Paolo was reelected as a member of the QGIS PSC where he has been helping in different roles.

Looking up the source code in GIT, I see that your first commit back in May 2011 was the translation of the words: Avvio, Scegli and Arrivo (Begin, Choose, Stop). I really hope that your next commit will be the translation of “Ri-Avvio” since I’m sure you still have a lot to give to QGIS as a community member!

Grazie di cuore!

I will continue to serve on the PSC as chair, and Anita Graser will take over the role of Vice-Chair. The board is completed by our longstanding treasurer Andreas Neumann.

I am also pleased to say that the project governance is in good hands with Jürgen Fischer and Alessandro Pasotti kindly making themselves available to serve on the PSC for another two years.

It is also great to know that our project founder, Gary Sherman, and long-term PSC member Tim Sutton continue to serve on the PSC as honorary PSC members. They both set the standard for our great project culture, and it is great to have his continued presence.

QGIS has been growing from strength to strength, backed by a really amazing community of kind and collaborative users, developers, contributors and funders. I look forward to seeing how it continues to grow and flourish.

Rock on QGIS!

Cheers

Marco Bernasocchi (QGIS.ORG Chair)

Plugin Update September 2022

The QGIS plugin repository currently lists 1710 plugins and the list keeps on growing. September has been busy with 16 new plugins. It can be challenging to stay up to date.

Our monthly plugin update is meant to provide you a quick overview of the newest plugins. If any of the names or short descriptions piques your interest, you can find the direct link to the plugin page in the table below the screenshot.

Site Schedule Optimization
Finds an optimal multi-day schedule for traveling to a set of locations.
Sentinel-5p data explorer
Sentinel-5p data explorer manage NC files from satellite “Sentinel-5p”.
CityTimer
Evaluate the distance from the 15min city of a context
Drone Path
This plugin prepares a drone flight path based on input polygon and drone camera parameters. This plugin gives a Fly Litchi compatible csv file with way points for the drone path.
Previsioni
This plugin connect to Previsioni API.
BecaGIS
BecaGIS GeoProcessing, Field Calculation Tools and Expressions
SenseRemote Detection
AI detection algorithms for remote sensing images.
Geotuileur
Plugin associated with the IGN France service of the same name: Geotuileur.
Groundwater Buffer Raster
Expands and interpolates edge values of Water Surface Elevation (WSE) rasters to produce groundwater (GW) buffer rasters
KoALA_Nx
KoALA-Nx supports optimal network analysis in various network environments. Users can apply the tool in all network environments, such as roads, railroads, and pedestrians. KoALA-Nx provides two functions: distance-based network analysis and time-based network analysis
Data Range Filter Legend Widget
Filter layer elements from the legend, using sliders that cover the range of each numeric field.
CO2_Sequestration
This plugin predicts the tree CO2 Sequestration by simply knowing the tree Diameter at Breast Height (DBH) and height of the tree.
PEC_Avalia
Realiza a avaliação da acurácia posicional em produtos e dados cartográficos, a partir de normas e padrões brasileiros
SecQuery
Render geodesic buffers with 4-32 sectors and query the point data in them.
Nearest with greater value
Get name (or ID) of and distance to the nearest feature with greater value in a certain field of a point layer. Returns point layer with added attributes and a line layer with connecting lines.
ODKConnector
Plugin to connect to the ODK (Open Data Kit) for data retrieval.

Plugin Update August 2022

The QGIS plugin repository currently lists 1694 plugins and the list keeps on growing, even during the holiday season. It can be challenging to stay up to date.

Our new monthly plugin update is meant to provide you a quick overview of the newest plugins. If any of the names or short descriptions piques your interest, you can find the direct link to the plugin page in the table below the screenshot.

STL Generator
This plugin lets you generate an STL from a DEM and allows the exclusion of nodata regions.
Maxent Model
Maxent mapping adapter for QGIS. Adaptador de cartografía Maxent para QGIS
SRApp
Synchronizacja z bazą danych aplikacji Metryka
QGIS Redistricting
Tool for drawing districting plans from geographic units
XPlan-Reader
Import XPlan-GML
GEO_search
Layer Geo Search
Check, Define & Convert CRS
Check, define and convert CRS
Dynamic Provider Filter Plugin
QGIS plugin to dynamically set provider filters using QGIS variable replacement.
TopoTijdreis
This plugin loads all historic maps from 1815-2020 from topotijdreis.nl into QGIS
Tanaka Contours
Generates Tanaka-contours from a DEM

QGIS 3.26 Buenos Aires is released!

We are pleased to announce the release of QGIS 3.26 ‘Buenos Aires’!

Installers for all supported operating systems are already out. QGIS 3.26 comes with tons of new features, as you can see in our visual changelog. QGIS 3.26 Buenos Aires is named after last year’s FOSS4G host city.

We would like to thank the developers, documenters, testers and all the many folks out there who volunteer their time and effort (or fund people to do so). From the QGIS community we hope you enjoy this release! If you wish to donate time, money or otherwise get involved in making QGIS more awesome, please wander along to qgis.org and lend a hand!

QGIS is supported by donors and sustaining members. A current list of donors who have made financial contributions large and small to the project can be seen on our donors list. If you would like to become a sustaining member, please visit our page for sustaining members for details. Your support helps us fund our six monthly developer meetings, maintain project infrastructure and fund bug fixing efforts.

QGIS is Free software and you are under no obligation to pay anything to use it – in fact we want to encourage people far and wide to use it regardless of what your financial or social status is – we believe empowering people with spatial decision making tools will result in a better society for all of humanity.

QGIS Userbase Analytics

Background

Understanding which regions QGIS is being used in, which versions are in active use, which platforms it is being used on, and how many users we have is hugely beneficial to our ability as a project to serve our users. Back in 2017 at the bi-annual QGIS hackfest in Nødebo, Denmark, we had a long discussion about key project goals and the need to better understand our user base in order to plan the future direction of the project, and allocate funding and resources to where they are needed most

Typically proprietary software vendors have ready access to detailed user data through telemetry code which they embed in their software. This telemetry code ‘phones home’ key metrics, which together with other techniques such as license sales analysis gives them a very detailed insight into their user base. The data these vendors collect is typically not shared, so their users do not benefit from being able to understand how their data is used.

For QGIS.org, having to resort to what are generally considered to be nefarious and privacy-invading techniques of siphoning user data from our users goes against the ethos we try to promote as an open project. Further, since QGIS is freely available and doesn’t require any self-registration, we do not have a user database we can consult for such analytics. Additional factors make understanding usage levels hard. For example, a single user can download a copy of a QGIS installer and distribute it to many other users, and conversely web crawlers and bots can download many copies of QGIS installers and never install them. Because of this, simply counting the number of downloads from our website does not give a useful picture of our user base.

So we needed to come up with an approach that:

  1. Does not invade our user’s privacy
  2. Does not require including telemetry code in QGIS which exfiltrates user information from their system
  3. Does not store any user-identifiable data on our servers
  4. Is open and transparent in the data collection methodology
  5. Openly shares the insights we gain from our analytics to the broader community

The most obvious privacy-respecting way we could find to understand more about our users was to collect metrics of access to the QGIS News Feed. In order to display the latest news on startup, QGIS Desktop makes a request to https://feed.qgis.org when it is opened. On the server that hosts the feed, we can then use the web server logs to understand which operating system and version of QGIS made the news feed request. Additionally, using the GeoIP library we can resolve each request to the country from which it originated. These pieces of information are included in the User-Agent headers sent by QGIS when it makes a request to the QGIS News Feed.

This process is anonymous, transparent, and simple to disable. It does not identify unique machines. Only one event is logged per unique network per hour. Only one event is logged per QGIS installation per day, and the event is only triggered when the user opens the QGIS Desktop application.

Operating system statistics are derived from QGIS version information, and no system fingerprinting or telemetry is implemented.

Location information is derived from the request source IP address, which is immediately discarded on the server after resolving it to the country of origin.

No logging on the QGIS News Feed server occurs with legacy installations that do not have the news feed feature, offline usage of QGIS, and installations for which feed collection is disabled (see below for info on how to disable it). It will also have statistics skewed in scenarios where atypical networking infrastructure is in effect, such as using a virtual private network.

Despite these caveats, the statistics should provide a good high-level overview of how QGIS is being used, such as the breakdown of QGIS across operating systems and versions – information that is incredibly useful to the QGIS developer team. Only the following four pieces of information are collected:

  • The date (aggregated by day)
  • The QGIS version
  • The Operating System
  • Country (based on IP which is immediately discarded)

Opting out

If you wish to opt-out of this data collection, simply disabling the feed retrieval, using QGIS offline, or blocking access to the QGIS RSS feed address (feed.qgis.org) on your network will exclude you from this process. QGIS Desktop provides options for disabling version checking and feed access under Settings ➔ Options ➔ General ➔ Application. Note that by default this setting is specific to each individual user profile.

Viewing the analytics

We have made a public dashboard publicly available at https://analytics.qgis.org. The dashboard was made using the fantastic open-source Metabase analytics package.

Credits: This post was written by Charles Dixon-Paver and Tim Sutton

Save the date: QGIS contributor meeting in Firenze

After a long hiatus, we are happy to announce that there will be a another international QGIS Contributor Meeting in conjunction with this year’s FOSS4G in Firenze, Italy from 18 to 22 August 2022.

QGIS Contributors Meetings are volunteer-driven events where contributors to the QGIS project from around the world get together in a common space – usually a university campus. The event is normally three days in duration and we hold two such events each year. During these events, contributors to the QGIS project take the opportunity to plan their work, hold face-to-face discussions and present new improvements to the QGIS project that they have been working on. Everybody attending the event donates their time to the project for the days of the event. As a project that is built primarily through online collaboration, these meetings provide a crucial ingredient to the future development of the QGIS project. The event is planned largely as an ‘unconference’ with minimal structured programme planning. We do this to allow attendees the freedom to meet dynamically with those they encounter at the event. Those sessions that are planned are advertised on the event web page and we try to enable remote participation through video conferencing software. Although our hosts are not funded and donate the working space to us, we show our appreciation by making one of our software release’s splash screens in honour of that host, which is a great way to gain exposure of your institution and country to the hundreds of thousands of users that make use of QGIS.

For more details and to sign up, please visit the corresponding wiki page.

QGIS Grant Programme 2022 Results

We are extremely pleased to announce the four funded proposals for our 2022 QGIS.ORG grant programme. Funding for the programme was sourced by you, our project donors and sponsorsNote: For more context surrounding our grant programme, please see: QGIS Grants #7: Call for Grant Proposals 2022

These are the proposals:

  1. Add SQL Logging to the debugging/development panel
  2. QGIS setting registry enhancement
  3. Fix handling of provider default value clauses/Autogenerate/nextval(…) handling
  4. Support building QGIS application on Qt 6

Since the total requested budget is equal to the available budget, there is no need for a voting this year.

On behalf of the QGIS.ORG project, I would like to thank everyone who submitted proposals for this call!

Reports from the winning grant proposals 2021

With the QGIS Grant Programme 2021, we were able to support eight proposals that are aimed to improve the QGIS project, including software, infrastructure, and documentation. The following reports summarize the work performed in the proposals. 

  1.  QGIS Server and services documentation (#213) – Report
    The Services chapter of the QGIS Server documentation needed some love to
    be effectively representative of the underlying implementation. Numerous
    services, requests or parameters were not documented at all. Some others
    also had very sketchy descriptions. Thanks to this QEP, the Services
    chapter is now in a much better shape!
  2. Rework handling of multi-layer, mixed-format datasets (#216) – Report
    While the work was partly motivated as an opportunity to clean up some
    older parts of the QGIS codebase which were fragile and had low test
    coverage, it has also resulted in many improvements and polish in the
    QGIS user interface.
  3. Port DB Manager Table Management Functionalities to Browser: SQL execution (part 3) (#205) – Report
    Besides SQL execution functionalities, an additional PR adds to QGIS core the query layer management tool that was provided by DB Manager plugin. The new API is fully covered by unit tests.
  4. Locale support for numeric input and display: revision and enhancements (#210) – Report
    The work has been completed with multiple pull requests that fixed all localization issues that have been reported plus countless unreported issues that have been identified along the way.
  5. Integrate GPS Tools plugin functionality into core QGIS (#217) – Report
    This grant sees the removal of the old, unmaintained “GPS Tools” core plugin, with all functionality from the plugin moved to reusable Processing algorithms or the unified Data Source Manager dialog. Since the functionality now uses the Processing framework, users gain the ability to run these tools in batch modes, as part of graphical models, and from 3rd party scripts and plugins. As a bonus the new tools are all fully covered by unit tests.
  6. QGIS Server, OGC tests and Continuous Integration: OGC API Features (part 2 (#212) – Report
    Thanks to the QEP funding, the OGC API Features standard for QGIS Server is
    now checked in QGIS continuous integration since end-November 2021.
  7. Fixing terrain and camera issues in 3D (#215) – Report
    These improvements should make the 3D map view easier to use. Especially the camera control issues (unintuitivie camera rotation and wrong center point) were quite tricky to fix.
  8. Review process on plugins.qgis.org and improvements (#219) – This proposal has been withdrawn.

Thank you to everyone who participated and made this round of grants a great success and thank you to all our sponsor and donors who make this initiative possible!

QGIS Annual General Meeting – 2021

Dear QGIS Community

We recently held our 2021 QGIS Annual General Meeting. The agenda included approval of the annual report and financial report 2020, as well as the new budget for 2022.

The minutes of this meeting are available for all to view.

Regards

Marco Bernasocchi (QGIS.ORG Chair)

QGIS Grants #7: Call for Grant Proposals 2022

Dear QGIS Community,

We are very pleased to announce that this year’s round of grants is now available. The call is open to anybody who wants to make a funded contribution to QGIS, subject to the call conditions outlined in the application form.

The deadline for this round is in four weeks, on 13th February 2022.

As of 2022, we are changing the procedure in the following ways:

  • The project budgets should account for PR reviewing expenses to ensure timely handling of the project-related PRs and avoid delays caused by relying on reviewer volunteer time. 
  • In the week after the QEP discussion period, the proposal authors are expected to write a short summary of the discussion that is suitable for use as a basis on which voting members make their decisions. 

Also, note the following guidelines established in previous years: 

  • The proposal must be submitted as a ‘QEP’ (QGIS Enhancement Proposal) issue in the repo: https://github.com/qgis/QGIS-Enhancement-Proposals (tagged as Grant-YEAR). Following this approach will allow people to ask questions and provide public feedback on individual proposals.
  • Proposals must clearly define the expected final result, so that we can properly assess if the goal of the proposal has been reached.

For more details, please read the introduction provided in the application form.

We look forward to seeing all your great ideas for improving QGIS!

QGIS and Log4j

The Log4J vulnerability has been dominating recent tech news. Consequently, we’ve received many request asking whether QGIS is affected. Therefore, we’d like to clarify:

QGIS is not a Java application. QGIS is built using C++ and Python. QGIS therefore does not use any Java component, including Log4j(ava).

It is technically possible that a plugin interfaces with Java applications. If you are aware of any potential vulnerabilities, please contact the plugin developers through the contact information provided in the plugin metadata.

QGIS LTR 3.16.13 reverted to 3.16.11

Dear community,

Due to some rather severe issues in the 3.16.13 and .12 Windows MSI installers, we decided to temporarily revert back the available download to the latest release without those issues, 3.16.11. The website rebuild has been performed and you’ll see everywhere that 3.16.11 is the latest LTR. This is true for Windows only as other OS will keep delivering the latest 3.16.13.

Next Friday 19th November is the planned release date for 3.16.14 which should bring fixes to both the above mentioned issues and restore the normal release flow.

Quoting our release manager Jürgen Fischer:”Only the 3.16.13 MSI is broken (not sure if 3.16.12-2 is affected). OSGeo4W
v2 was meanwhile fixed. All other platforms are not affected at all. The next release is on Friday and will also produce a fresh MSI.”

We apologize for the inconvenience and would like to take the opportunity to remind you how much work goes into producing and maintaining the high quality product that you’ve grown to love and that this is only possible thanks to our sustaining members and volunteers. If you or your organisation is relying on QGIS, it might be a good time to consider joining QGIS’ funding effort at https://qgis.org/funding or https://github.com/sponsors/qgis/

Have a great week, cheers

Marco

Original post: https://lists.osgeo.org/pipermail/qgis-user/2021-November/050193.html


Megaphone icon made by BomSymbols from www.flaticon.com

PSA: Update to 3.16.13

This is a public service announcement:

Our developers have discovered a critical issue in QGIS 3.16.12 which may cause plugins to hang on Windows. All users are encouraged to upgrade to 3.16.13


Megaphone icon made by BomSymbols from www.flaticon.com

QGIS 3.22 Białowieża is released!

We are pleased to announce the release of QGIS 3.22 ‘Białowieża’!

Installers for all supported operating systems are already out. QGIS 3.22 comes with tons of new features, as you can see in our visual changelog. QGIS 3.22 Białowieża is aimed at celebrating the 100-year anniversary of Białowieża National Park, Poland. You can learn more about the project and this release of QGIS at the dedicated project website, https://qgisbialowieza.pl.

We would like to thank the developers, documenters, testers and all the many folks out there who volunteer their time and effort (or fund people to do so). From the QGIS community we hope you enjoy this release! If you wish to donate time, money or otherwise get involved in making QGIS more awesome, please wander along to qgis.org and lend a hand!

QGIS is supported by donors and sustaining members. A current list of donors who have made financial contributions large and small to the project can be seen on our donors list. If you would like to become a sustaining member, please visit our page for sustaining members for details. Your support helps us fund our six monthly developer meetings, maintain project infrastructure and fund bug fixing efforts.

QGIS is Free software and you are under no obligation to pay anything to use it – in fact we want to encourage people far and wide to use it regardless of what your financial or social status is – we believe empowering people with spatial decision making tools will result in a better society for all of humanity.

QGIS Open Day – 24 Sept 2021

Dear QGIS Users

On Friday, 24 September 2021 we will be holding our monthly QGIS Open Day!

Programme

My QGIS. Each of us has a specialty in QGIS and our own workflows and tricks join this months QGIS Openday to learn from each other.

Where to watch

Please see the event wiki page at for all the details of times and links for participation.

Recordings

All of the YouTube live-streamed events will be recorded and made available on the QGIS Open Day Youtube channel.

If you missed the last event, have a look at the excellent contributions by Leonardo Nazareth (Brazil), Victoria Neema (Kenya), and Tim Sutton (Portugal):

(YouTube live streams sometimes take 24 hours to be available for catch-up viewing. Be sure to check back here for updates!)

Code of Conduct

Participants are kindly reminded to please read and observe our QGIS Code of Conduct and Diversity Statement to make these events a great experience for everyone!

Please contact Amy on Twitter @amzenviro or via the Telegram Channel if you have any queries or need help setting up events.

We look forward to seeing you there!

Regards

The QGIS Open Day Organising Team!

In memory of Martin Isenburg

Being part of an open community like QGIS is a unique experience. We get to engage with and become friends with people from many different backgrounds and walks of life. Each person brings their unique flavour to the project and helps create something that is more than just the sum of its parts. The QGIS community is blessed enough to also have attracted some of the greatest minds in the Open Source Geospatial community.

Martin Isenburg was one of these great minds – his work on LASTools and making LiDAR data accessible to the world was truly groundbreaking. The .LAS/.LAZ formats for point cloud data have become ubiquitous, supported by virtually all point cloud processing tools in existence.

This week we received the incredibly sad news that Martin is no longer with us. Martin was a regular fixture at QGIS Hackfests, sitting quietly to one side doing incredible things with his plugin that integrates LASTools into QGIS or sharing a stand-up paddleboard outing with fellow QGISers.

Beyond being a gifted software developer, Martin was acutely aware of our impact on the world and its perilous ecological state. Like many in the QGIS community, he cared not only about technology but also about the potential of technology to transform lives and improve the planet and the human condition. With great sadness, we say a last goodbye to Martin Isenburg and wish his loved ones our deepest condolences.

Thank you, Martin, we will miss you.

The QGIS Community

QGIS 3.20 Odense is released!

We are pleased to announce the release of QGIS 3.20 ‘Odense’!

Installers for all supported operating systems are already out. QGIS 3.20 comes with tons of new features, as you can see in our visual changelog. The Danish user group also provides additional background information about Odense and the map featured on the splash screen on their website.

We would like to thank the developers, documenters, testers and all the many folks out there who volunteer their time and effort (or fund people to do so). From the QGIS community we hope you enjoy this release! If you wish to donate time, money or otherwise get involved in making QGIS more awesome, please wander along to qgis.org and lend a hand!

QGIS is supported by donors and sustaining members. A current list of donors who have made financial contributions large and small to the project can be seen on our donors list. If you would like to become a sustaining member, please visit our page for sustaining members for details. Your support helps us fund our six monthly developer meetings, maintain project infrastructure and fund bug fixing efforts.

QGIS is Free software and you are under no obligation to pay anything to use it – in fact we want to encourage people far and wide to use it regardless of what your financial or social status is – we believe empowering people with spatial decision making tools will result in a better society for all of humanity.

Håvard Tveite has passed away

It is with a heavy heart that we announce that on 2021-05-31, our friend and colleague Håvard Tveite has passed away at the age of 59 after a period of illness.

Håvard was a very active member of the QGIS community, providing valuable input to the documentation, developing numerous plugins, and taking care of the QGIS Resources Sharing Repository to name just a few of his contributions.   

Besides his contributions to the QGIS project, Håvard was also an active volunteer in the Norwegian Orienteering Federation and in the International Orienteering Federation Map Commission (more: https://orienteering.sport/norwegian-great-havard-tveite-has-passed-away/)

The QGIS community would like to extend our heartfelt condolences to Håvard’s wife Ingrid and son Nils.  Håvard’s contributions to the QGIS Project will leave a lasting impact on the lives of many people around the world as they benefit from the work he has done on a daily basis.

R.I.P. Håvard

Reports from the winning grant proposals 2020

With the QGIS Grant Programme 2020, we were able to support ten proposals that were aimed to improve the QGIS project, including software, infrastructure, and documentation. The following reports summarize the work performed in the proposals. We’ll update this blog post as more reports come in:

  1. Quality Assurance methodology and infrastructure (Alexandre Neto, Alexander Bruy, Giovanni Manghi)

    The Tester plugin has been updated to run on QGIS 3.x. It allows to run automated and semi-automated tests and helps to conduct testing by providing step-by-step instructions to perform manual or verification tasks. An initial small set of tests for QGIS core functionality has been implemented as a separate QGIS Core Tests plugin. Furthermore, a test management system and test plan based on KIWI TCMS has been set up and documentation for testers has been created and published.

  2. Smarter map redraws + tile download manager (Martin Dobias)

    Smarter Map Redraws avoid the annoying flicker when map in the map canvas is zoomed or moved. It is especially noticeable with background maps. The work has reduced the problem especially for raster layers. See the videos of comparison before/after.
    Tile Download Manager is not going to be very visible to the users, but it should make QGIS behave nicely with remote servers – until now it would be common that QGIS would request raster/vector tiles, then abort the requests while they were in progress when map got moved/zoomed, only to start those requests again – this should be avoided now.

  3. DB Manager Table Management Functionalities to Browser Port – part 2 (Alessandro Pasotti)

    QGIS browser now exposes a new “Fields” item for vector layers that can be expanded to show the underlying fields, an icon identifies the base field type. New context menu items allow user to create and delete fields. At the connection level, a new context menu item allows you to create a new table for all DB connections that support the Connections API (PG, Spatialite, GPKG, MSSQL). All the new functions are implemented using the new connections API and exposed to Python for plugins/scripts. There have been many other small improvements in the API and in the browser, such as homogenization of the error/warning/success reporting .

  4. QGIS Server, OGC tests and Continuous Integration (Paul Blottiere)
    A Python tool named pyogctest has been implemented to run OGC tests in command line for the WMS 1.3.0 testsuite and has been integrated with GitHub Action in QGIS continuous integration mechanism to avoid regressions. The documentation chapter about OGC and conformance tests is now up-to-date with an explanation of how pyogctest can be used locally for server developers. Moreover, pyogctest is now also integrated with QGIS-Server-CertifSuite for the nightly tests. This way we have an homogeneous testing environment with CI. 
  5. QGIS Server performance monitoring (Paul Blottiere)
    The whole QGIS-Server-PerfSuite has been upgraded to use 3.10 and 3.14 releases side by side with 2.18 and master branch. Performances may be now monitored daily with the latest releases. Moreover, a simple anomalies detection mechanism has been implemented and a mail is sent if a regression is detected. Several scenarios have been added to compare performance with the same data but relying on different providers (PostGIS, Spatialite, Geopackage and Shapefile). Finally, a simple mechanism based on multiprocessing has been implemented to simulate multi-clients situation. 
  6. FileGeodatabase spatial index in OpenFileGDB driver (Even Rouault)
    This work has been successfully completed in GDAL master (for GDAL 3.2) and automatically benefits QGIS when it uses the OpenFileGDB driver. Performance-wise, for example, counting the number of features intersecting a spatial filter which returns 81 046 polygons, now runs in 400 ms with GDAL 3.2dev and the OpenFileGDB driver, versus 6.7 s before (full scan), vs 890 ms with the FileGDB driver (with FileGDB SDK 1.5). Interactive display in QGIS with the OpenFileGDB driver is as fluid as with the FileGDB one. Comparing behaviour of OpenFileGDB and FileGDB drivers with strace shows that they read a similar amount of data in the .spx file, which confirms it is uses correctly. The filegdb reverse engineered specification was also updated.
  7. MacOS packages (Peter Petrik)
    All tasks from the proposal except the notarization process have been addressed since the work necessary to address critical bugs in projection, grass, saga, gdal, python and other parts of the MacOS packages exceeded expectations. (A note about the workaround for notarization has been added to the QGIS.org webpage for now.) Key improvements for QGIS 3.16 MacOS Packages are: QGIS-Mac-Packager without homebrew dependencies, updated GDAL3, PROJ6 & GRASS 7.8.2, fixed Grass, Saga &, GDAL provider loading, and many more. 
  8. Evaluate Qt for Python (Denis Rouzaud)
    The initial evaluation was followed by a report on the migration to Qt-for-Python. The report’s recommendations are now being discussed in QEP#237.
  9. Settings registry (Denis Rouzaud)
    The complete implementation of the core part has been achieved (settings, registry and Python bindings). All core settings were migrated. Other settings still have to be migrated, CI tests should be added to avoid usage of the old API and potential GUI improvements are outlined in the report.
  10. To be continued 

Thank you to everyone who participated and made this round of grants a great success and thank you to all our sponsor and donors who make this initiative possible!

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