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GRASS GIS Annual Report 2023

The GRASS GIS Annual Report for 2023 highlights a year of significant achievements and developments in the GRASS GIS project, which celebrated its 40th anniversary.

GRASS GIS people on hilltop 2023

Here’s a summary of the report:

  1. Community Meeting: The GRASS GIS Community Meeting was held in June at the Czech Technical University in Prague, bringing together a diverse group of participants from various countries. Additionally, community members participated in the OSGeo Community Sprint in Vienna in November.
  2. Development Activity: The year saw the release of the GRASS GIS 8.3.0 feature release and three maintenance releases. There were 418 pull requests created, 387 merged, and 103 issues resolved. Nine new addons were added by several contributors. The top five contributors were acknowledged, and a new core contributor was welcomed. Also a GRASS Student Grant was awarded.
  3. Conferences in 2023: GRASS GIS was represented at several conferences, including the North Carolina GIS conference, FOSS4G in Kosovo and North America, and the OpenGeoHub Summer School. Topics covered ranged from parallelization in GRASS GIS to computational notebooks for geospatial computation.
  4. GRASS GIS in Industry: OpenPlains Inc., a startup utilizing GRASS GIS, was founded. Additionally, a subaward was granted to research software engineers at North Carolina State University to enhance GRASS GIS, funded by an NSF grant awarded to Natrx.
  5. GRASS GIS in Academia: A significant NSF grant was awarded to a team from four U.S. universities to support the GRASS GIS community. Various academic activities, including workshops, courses, and lectures, were conducted throughout the year, emphasizing the application of GRASS GIS in different fields.
  6. GRASS GIS in Government: The U.S. Geological Survey released a training video on using GRASS GIS with 3D Elevation Program data. The NC State University team received research support from the US Department of Agriculture for developing GRASS modules for surface water modeling.

GRASS GIS Desktop showing maps

Congratulations to all contributors!

The full report is available at https://grass.osgeo.org/news/2023_12_19_annual_report/

The post GRASS GIS Annual Report 2023 appeared first on Markus Neteler Consulting.

Translating Open Source Software with Weblate: A GRASS GIS Case Study

Open source software projects thrive on the contributions of the community, not only for the code, but also for making the software accessible to a global audience. One of the critical aspects of this accessibility is the localization or translation of the software’s messages and interfaces. In this context, Weblate (https://weblate.org/) has proven to be a powerful tool for managing these translations, especially for projects such as GRASS GIS, which is part of OSGeo (Open Source Geospatial Foundation).

Weblate software logoGRASS GIS logo

What is Weblate?

Weblate is an open source translation management system designed to simplify the translation process of software projects. It provides an intuitive web interface that allows translators to work without deep technical knowledge. This ease of use combined with robust integration capabilities makes Weblate a popular choice for open source projects.

GRASS GIS and Localization

GRASS GIS (https://grass.osgeo.org/), a software suite for managing and analyzing geospatial data, is used worldwide and therefore needs to be available in many languages. The project uses Weblate, hosted by OSGeo, to manage and facilitate its translation work (see OSGeo-Weblate portal).

Marking messages for translation

Before translation work can begin, the messages to be translated must be marked for translation in the GRASS GIS source code. This is done with the gettext macro _(“…”). GNU gettext is a GNU library for the internationalization of software. Here is a simplified overview of the process:

  1. Identify the strings to be translated: The developers identify the strings in the source code that need to be translated. These are usually user messages, while debug messages are not marked for translation.
  2. Use the gettext macro: The identified strings are packed into a gettext macro. For example, a string “Welcome to GRASS GIS” in the source code would be changed to _(“Welcome to GRASS GIS”). This change indicates that the string should be used for translation.
  3. Extraction and template generation: Tools such as xgettext are used to extract these marked strings from the source code and create a POT (Portable Object Template) file. This file is used as a template for all translations. In the GRASS GIS project the template language is English.

There are three template files in the GRASS GIS project: one with the graphical user interface (GUI) messages, one with the library functions (libs) and one with the modules (mods).

Connecting the software project to Weblate

While the POT files could be transferred to Weblate manually, we chose the automated option. The OSGeo Weblate instance is directly connected to the GRASS GIS project via git (GitHub) using the Weblate version control integration.

How it works in practice:

  1. Developer makes a commit to the GRASS GIS repo on GitHub
  2. A GitHub webhook makes a call to weblate.osgeo.org – note that it has it’s own local git repo for GRASS GIS, as it does for other OSGeo projects, with translations being managed in this Weblate instance. This local git repo is updated when the webhook is fired.
  3. As messages are translated in OSGeo-Weblate, they are eventually pushed to the Weblate Github fork of GRASS GIS (the push frequency is set to 24 hours by default, i.e., new translations are collected over a day), and Weblate then triggers a pull request to the main GRASS GIS repo on GitHub.

For technical background on the OSGeo Weblate installation, see the related OSGeo-SAC Weblate page.

Translation process in Weblate

Here is how the typical translation process looks like:

  • Translator registration: Registration (via OSGeo-ID) and login to the Weblate instance.
  • Language selection: Select the language to be translated. If a language does not exist yet, it can be added with the approval of the project managers.
  • Translation interface: Weblate provides an easy-to-use web interface where translators can view the original texts and enter their translations. If activated, machine translation can also be used here (DeepL, Google Translate, etc.). The Weblate translation memory helps to quickly translate identical and similar sentences.
GRASS GIS messages in Weblate

GRASS GIS messages in Weblate

  • Together we are better: translators can discuss translations, resolve conflicts and suggest improvements. Weblate also offers quality checks to ensure consistency and accuracy. Translations in different languages can be compared in tabular form.
Message translation comparison in Weblate (GRASS GIS project example)

Message translation comparison in Weblate (GRASS GIS project example)

  • Integration with source code: Once translations are completed and checked, they are written back into the GRASS GIS source code (see above). Weblate supports automatic synchronization with source code repositories.
  • Continuous updates: As the source code evolves, new strings can be marked for translation and Weblate is automatically updated to reflect these changes.
Pull request with new translations opened by Weblate in GRASS GIS Github repository

Pull request with new translations opened by Weblate in GRASS GIS Github repository

Benefits for the GRASS GIS project

By using Weblate, GRASS GIS benefits from the following advantages:

  • Streamlined translation workflow: The process from tagging strings to integrating translations is efficient and manageable.
  • Community engagement: Weblate’s ease of use encourages more community members to participate in the translation process.
  • Quality and Consistency: Weblate ensures high quality translations through integrated quality checks and collaboration tools.
  • Up-to-date localization: Continuous synchronization with the source code repository ensures that translations are always up-to-date.

Conclusion

The integration of Weblate into the GRASS GIS development workflow underlines the importance of localization in open source software. By using tools such as gettext for message tagging and Weblate for translation management, GRASS GIS ensures that it remains accessible and usable for a global community, embodying the true spirit of open source software.

Thanks

Thanks to Regina Obe from OSGeo-SAC for her support in setting up and maintaining the OSGeo-Weblate instance and for her explanations of how things work in terms of Weblate/GitHub server communication.

The post Translating Open Source Software with Weblate: A GRASS GIS Case Study appeared first on Markus Neteler Consulting.

GRASS GIS 8.3.1 released

What’s new in a nutshell

The GRASS GIS 8.3.1 maintenance release provides more than 60 changes compared to 8.3.0. This new patch release brings in important fixes and improvements in GRASS GIS modules and the graphical user interface (GUI) which stabilizes the new single window layout active by default.

Some of the most relevant changes include: fixes for r.watershed which got partially broken in the 8.3.0 release; and a fix for installing addons on MS Windows with g.extension.

Translations continue in Weblate, which automatically creates pull requests with the translated chunks. We’d like to thank the translators of all languages for their ongoing support!

GRASS GIS 8.3.1 graphical user interface

Full list of changes and contributors

For all 60+ changes, see our detailed announcement with the full list of features and bugs fixed at GitHub / Releases / 8.3.1.

Thanks to all contributors!

Software downloads

Binaries/Installers download

Further binary packages for other platforms and distributions will follow shortly, please check at software downloads.

Source code download

First time users may explore the first steps tutorial after installation.

About GRASS GIS

The Geographic Resources Analysis Support System (https://grass.osgeo.org/), commonly referred to as GRASS GIS, is an Open Source Geographic Information System providing powerful raster, vector and geospatial processing capabilities. It can be used either as a stand-alone application, as backend for other software packages such as QGIS and R, or in the cloud. It is distributed freely under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL). GRASS GIS is a founding member of the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo).

The GRASS Dev Team

The post GRASS GIS 8.3.1 released appeared first on Markus Neteler Consulting.

GRASS GIS 8.3.0 released

What’s new in a nutshell

The GRASS GIS 8.3.0 release provides more than 360 changes compared to the 8.2 branch. This new minor release brings in many fixes and improvements in GRASS GIS modules and the graphical user interface (GUI) which now has the single window layout by default. Some of the most relevant changes include: support for parallelization in three raster modules, new options added to several temporal modules, and substantial clean-up of g.extension, the module that allows the installation of add-ons. The GUI also received a lot of attention with many fixes and items reorganised. We have also adopted the Clang format and indented most of the C code accordingly. A lot of effort was put into cleaning up the C/C++ code to fix almost all compiler warnings.

Translations have been moved from Transifex to Weblate, which automatically creates pull requests with the translated chunks. We’d like to thank the translators of all languages for their long term support!

GRASS GIS 8.3

Also, docker images have been updated and moved from the mundialis to the OSGeo organization at https://hub.docker.com/r/osgeo/grass-gis/.

We have carried out quite some work in the GitHub Actions: we added support for “pre-commit” in order to reduce unnecessary runs of the automated checks, there were notable improvements in the code checking section and we have activated renovatebot to automatically maintain GitHub Actions.

Last but not least, we have significantly improved the automated release creation to reduce maintainer workload and we have gained nine new contributors! Welcome all!!

Full list of changes and contributors

For all 360+ changes, see our detailed announcement with the full list of features and bugs fixed at GitHub / Releases / 8.3.0.

Thank you all contributors!!

Download and test!

Binaries/Installers download

Further binary packages for other platforms and distributions will follow shortly, please check at software downloads.

Source code download

First time users may explore the first steps tutorial after installation.

About GRASS GIS

The Geographic Resources Analysis Support System (https://grass.osgeo.org/), commonly referred to as GRASS GIS, is an Open Source Geographic Information System providing powerful raster, vector and geospatial processing capabilities. It can be used either as a stand-alone application, as backend for other software packages such as QGIS and R, or in the cloud. It is distributed freely under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL). GRASS GIS is a founding member of the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo).

The GRASS Dev Team

The post GRASS GIS 8.3.0 released appeared first on Markus Neteler Consulting.

GRASS GIS 8.2.0 released

The 8.2.0 release of GRASS GIS is now available with results from the GSoC 2021 and many other additions. A new grass.jupyter package is now included for interacting with Jupyter notebooks. Single window graphical user interface is available in GUI settings. r.series and three other modules are newly parallelized. Additionally, the release includes a series of scripting, packaging, and reproducibility improvements.

For all 220+ changes, see our detailed announcement with the full contributors and list of features and bugs fixed at GitHub / Releases / 8.2.0. Special thanks to GSoC students, their mentors, and first-time contributors!

Packages and installers are now available for Windows, macOS, Debian, Fedora, and Gentoo with more coming soon.

See more at grass.osgeo.org / News.

The post GRASS GIS 8.2.0 released appeared first on Markus Neteler Consulting.

GRASS GIS 8.0.0 released! Finally…

Overview of changes

After more than 3 year of development the first stable release GRASS GIS 8.0.0 is available. Efforts have concentrated on making the user experience even better, providing many new useful additional functionalities to modules and further improving the graphical user interface.

Breaking news: new graphical user interface with entirely rewritten startup sequence!

This re-establishes user experience compatibility with QGIS and other connected software packages.

The GRASS GIS 8.0.0 release provides more than 1,400 fixes and improvements with respect to the release 7.8.6.

With the introduction of the semantic label raster metadata class, the temporal database was modified to version 3. Hence, to be able to read and process GRASS 7.x space-time datasets, users will be prompted to run t.upgrade. If users want to read newly created space-time datasets back in GRASS 7.x, they can run t.downgrade.

Launching the software

The user experience of the graphical user interface has been completely rewritten: no more clumsy selection screens – just enter the menu system directly! And on command line, GRASS GIS now starts versionless, i.e. as grass. Enjoy!

Download and detailed list of changes

Thanks to all contributors!

GRASS GIS 8.0.0RC2 contributors

The post GRASS GIS 8.0.0 released! Finally… appeared first on Markus Neteler Consulting.

GRASS GIS 8.0.0RC2 released

Overview of changes

After more than 3 year of development the first stable release GRASS GIS 8.0.0 is available. Efforts have concentrated on making the user experience even better, providing many new useful additional functionalities to modules and further improving the graphical user interface.

Breaking news: new graphical user interface with entirely rewritten startup sequence!

This re-establishes user experience compatibility with QGIS and other connected software packages.

The GRASS GIS 8.0.0 release provides more than 1,300 fixes and improvements with respect to the release 7.8.6.

With the introduction of the semantic label raster metadata class, the temporal database was modified to version 3. Hence, to be able to read and process GRASS 7.x space-time datasets, users will be prompted to run t.upgrade. If users want to read newly created space-time datasets back in GRASS 7.x, they can run t.downgrade.

Launching the software

The user experience of the graphical user interface has been completely rewritten: no more clumsy selection screens – just enter the menu system directly!

And on command line, GRASS GIS now starts versionless, i.e. as grass.

Download and detailed list of changes

See https://github.com/OSGeo/grass/releases/tag/8.0.0RC2

Thanks to all contributors!

GRASS GIS 8.0.0RC2 contributors

The post GRASS GIS 8.0.0RC2 released appeared first on Markus Neteler Consulting.

GRASS GIS 7.8.5 released

What’s new in a nutshell Zanzibar Mapping Initiative data processed in OpenDroneMap and interpolated respecting building footprints using v.surf.icw

As a follow-up to the previous GRASS GIS 7.8.4 we have published the new release GRASS GIS 7.8.5 with more than 80 improvements. This minor release offers new wxGUI fixes across the tree. Also the addon extension manager received various stability fixes. VRT raster map with tiled raster maps can now be properly exported and imported in the native GRASS GIS raster format.

The overview of new features in the 7.8 release series is available at new features in GRASS GIS 7.8. See also our detailed announcement with the full list of changes and bugs fixed at https://trac.osgeo.org/grass/wiki/Release/7.8.5-News.

Binaries/Installer download:

Source code download:

First time users may explore the first steps tutorial after installation.

About GRASS GIS

The Geographic Resources Analysis Support System (https://grass.osgeo.org/), commonly referred to as GRASS GIS, is an Open Source Geographic Information System providing powerful raster, vector and geospatial processing capabilities. It can be used either as a stand-alone application or as backend for other software packages such as QGIS and R geostatistics or in the cloud. It is distributed freely under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL). GRASS GIS is a founding member of the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo).

The GRASS Development Team, Dec 2020

The post GRASS GIS 7.8.5 released appeared first on Markus Neteler Consulting.

MapScaping podcast: GRASS GIS probably doesn’t get the attention it deserves

THE MAPSCAPING PODCAST, GRASS GIS episode

In episode 86 of MapScaping podcast, Markus Neteler talks about the functionality offered (the topological vector engine, 2D and 3D raster analysis, image processing and available programming interfaces), and whom GRASS GIS is for.

Markus is the cofounder of mundialis, a Bonn based business. He is also the Chairman of the GRASS GIS Project Steering Committee.

Enjoy the podcast and the transcript!

The post MapScaping podcast: GRASS GIS probably doesn’t get the attention it deserves appeared first on Markus Neteler | Geospatial Analysis | Remote sensing | GRASS GIS.

GRASS GIS 7.8.4 released

1. What’s new in a nutshell

Processed LiDAR data in GRASS GIS (screenshot by @neteler)As a follow-up to the previous GRASS GIS 7.8.3 we have published the new release GRASS GIS 7.8.4 with more than 170 improvements. This minor release again focuses on wxGUI fixes, especially in the animation export, the layer management, 3D visualization and the data catalogue. Many display modules received fixes as well, and the vector digitizer now works as expected.

The overview of new features in the 7.8 release series is available at new features in GRASS GIS 7.8. See also our detailed announcement with the full list of changes and bugs fixed at https://trac.osgeo.org/grass/wiki/Release/7.8.4-News.

Binaries/Installer download:

Source code download:

First time users may explore the first steps tutorial after installation.

About GRASS GIS

The Geographic Resources Analysis Support System (https://grass.osgeo.org/), commonly referred to as GRASS GIS, is an Open Source Geographic Information System providing powerful raster, vector and geospatial processing capabilities. It can be used either as a stand-alone application or as backend for other software packages such as QGIS and R geostatistics or in the cloud. It is distributed freely under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL). GRASS GIS is a founding member of the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo).

The GRASS Development Team, Oct 2020

The post GRASS GIS 7.8.4 released appeared first on GFOSS Blog | GRASS GIS and OSGeo News.

GRASS GIS 7.8.2 released

GRASS GIS 7.8.2 released with updated PROJ 6 and GDAL 3 support

What’s new in a nutshell

As a follow-up to the recent GRASS GIS 7.8.1 we have pusblished the new stable release GRASS GIS 7.8.2.
Besides other improvements, the release contains important PROJ 4/5/6 related datum handling fixes, wxGUI fixes and a fix for the vector import from PostGIS databases.

An overview of the new features in the 7.8 release series is available at new features in GRASS GIS 7.8.

Binaries/Installer download:

Source code download:

See also our detailed announcement:

First time users may explore the first steps tutorial after installation.

About GRASS GIS

The Geographic Resources Analysis Support System (https://grass.osgeo.org/), commonly referred to as GRASS GIS, is an Open Source Geographic Information System providing powerful raster, vector and geospatial processing capabilities in a single integrated software suite. GRASS GIS includes tools for spatial modeling, visualization of raster and vector data, management and analysis of geospatial data, and the processing of satellite and aerial imagery. It also provides the capability to produce sophisticated presentation graphics and hardcopy maps. GRASS GIS has been translated into about twenty languages and supports a huge array of data formats. It can be used either as a stand-alone application or as backend for other software packages such as QGIS and R geostatistics. It is distributed freely under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL). GRASS GIS is a founding member of the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo).

The GRASS Development Team, December 2019

The post GRASS GIS 7.8.2 released appeared first on GFOSS Blog | GRASS GIS and OSGeo News.

Call for testing: GRASS GIS with Python 3

Please help us testing the Python3 support in the yet unreleased GRASS GIS trunk (i.e., version “grass77” which will be released as “grass78” in the near future).

1. Why Python 3?

Python 2 is end-of-life (EOL); the current Python 2.7 will retire in 11 months from today (see https://pythonclock.org). We want to follow the “Moving to require Python 3” and complete the change to Python 3. And we need a broader community testing.

2. Download and test!

Packages are available at time:

3. Instructions for testing

4. Problems found? Please report them to us

Problems and bugs can be reported in the GRASS GIS trac. Code changes are welcome!

Thanks for testing grass77!

The post Call for testing: GRASS GIS with Python 3 appeared first on GFOSS Blog | GRASS GIS and OSGeo News.

Celebrating 35 years of GRASS GIS!

Today marks 35 years of GRASS GIS development – with frequent releases the project keeps pushing the limits in terms of geospatial data processing quality and performance.

GRASS (Geographic Resources Analysis Support System) is a free and open source Geographic Information System (GIS) software suite used for geospatial data management and analysis, image processing, graphics and map production, spatial modeling, and 3D visualization. Since the major GRASS GIS 7 version, it also comes with a feature rich engine for space-time cubes useful for time series processing of Landsat and Copernicus Sentinel satellite data and more. GRASS GIS can be either used as a desktop application or as a backend for other software packages such as QGIS and R. Furthermore, it is frequently used on HPC and cloud infrastructures for massive parallelized data processing.

Brief history
In 1982, under the direction of Bill Goran at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (CERL), two GIS development efforts were undertaken. First, Lloyd Van Warren, a University of Illinois engineering student, began development on a new computer program that allowed analysis of mapped data.  Second, Jim Westervelt (CERL) developed a GIS package called “LAGRID – the Landscape Architecture Gridcell analysis system” as his master’s thesis. Thirty five years ago, on 29 July 1983, the user manual for this new system titled “GIS Version 1 Reference Manual” was first published by J. Westervelt and M. O’Shea. With the technical guidance of Michael Shapiro (CERL), the software continued its development at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (USA/CERL) in Champaign, Illinois; and after further expansion version 1.0 was released in 1985 under the name Geographic Resources Analysis Support System (GRASS). The GRASS GIS community was established the same year with the first annual user meeting and the launch of GRASSnet, one of the internet’s early mailing lists. The user community expanded to a larger audience in 1991 with the “Grasshopper” mailing list and the introduction of the World Wide Web. The users’ and programmers’ mailing lists archives for these early years are still available online.
In the mid 1990s the development transferred from USA/CERL to The Open GRASS Consortium (a group who would later generalize to become today’s Open Geospatial Consortium — the OGC). The project coordination eventually shifted to the international development team made up of governmental and academic researchers and university scientists. Reflecting this shift to a project run by the users, for the users, in 1999 GRASS GIS was released under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL). A detailed history of GRASS GIS can be found at https://grass.osgeo.org/history/.

Where to next?
The development on GRASS GIS continues with more energy and interest than ever. Parallel to the long-term maintenance of the GRASS 7.4 stable series, effort is well underway on the new upcoming cutting-edge 7.6 release, which will bring many new features, enhancements, and cleanups. As in the past, the GRASS GIS community is open to any contribution, be it in the form of programming, documentation, testing, and financial sponsorship. Please contact us!

About GRASS GIS

The Geographic Resources Analysis Support System (https://grass.osgeo.org/), commonly referred to as GRASS GIS, is an Open Source Geographic Information System providing powerful raster, vector and geospatial processing capabilities in a single integrated software suite. GRASS GIS includes tools for spatial modeling, visualization of raster and vector data, management and analysis of geospatial data, and the processing of satellite and aerial imagery. It also provides the capability to produce sophisticated presentation graphics and hardcopy maps. GRASS GIS has been translated into about twenty languages and supports a huge array of data formats. It can be used either as a stand-alone application or as backend for other software packages such as QGIS and R geostatistics. It is distributed freely under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL). GRASS GIS is a founding member of the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo).

The GRASS Development Team, July 2018

The post Celebrating 35 years of GRASS GIS! appeared first on GFOSS Blog | GRASS GIS and OSGeo News.

GRASS GIS 7.2.2 released

GRASS GIS 7.2.2 in action

What’s new in a nutshell

After three months of development the new update release GRASS GIS 7.2.2 is available. It provides more than 120 stability fixes and manual improvements compared to release version 7.2.1. An overview of new features in the 7.2 release series is available at New Features in GRASS GIS 7.2.

About GRASS GIS 7: Its graphical user interface supports the user to make complex GIS operations as simple as possible. The updated Python interface to the C library permits users to create new GRASS GIS-Python modules in a simple way while yet obtaining powerful and fast modules. Furthermore, the libraries were again significantly improved for speed and efficiency, along with support for huge files. A lot of effort has been invested to standardize parameter and flag names. Finally, GRASS GIS 7 comes with a series of new modules to analyse raster and vector data, along with a full temporal framework. For a detailed overview, see the list of new features. As a stable release series, 7.2.x enjoys long-term support.

Binaries/Installer download:

Source code download:

More details:

See also our detailed announcement:

First time users may explore the first steps tutorial after installation.

About GRASS GIS

The Geographic Resources Analysis Support System (https://grass.osgeo.org/), commonly referred to as GRASS GIS, is an Open Source Geographic Information System providing powerful raster, vector and geospatial processing capabilities in a single integrated software suite. GRASS GIS includes tools for spatial modeling, visualization of raster and vector data, management and analysis of geospatial data, and the processing of satellite and aerial imagery. It also provides the capability to produce sophisticated presentation graphics and hardcopy maps. GRASS GIS has been translated into about twenty languages and supports a huge array of data formats. It can be used either as a stand-alone application or as backend for other software packages such as QGIS and R geostatistics. It is distributed freely under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL). GRASS GIS is a founding member of the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo).

The GRASS Development Team, Sep 2017

The post GRASS GIS 7.2.2 released appeared first on GFOSS Blog | GRASS GIS Courses.

GRASS GIS 7.2.1 released

We are pleased to announce the update release GRASS GIS 7.2.1

GRASS GIS 7.2.1 in actionWhat’s new in a nutshell

After four months of development the new update release GRASS GIS 7.2.1 is available. It provides more than 150 stability fixes and manual improvements compared to the first stable release version 7.2.0. An overview of new features in this release series is available at New Features in GRASS GIS 7.2.

About GRASS GIS 7: Its graphical user interface supports the user to make complex GIS operations as simple as possible. The updated Python interface to the C library permits users to create new GRASS GIS-Python modules in a simple way while yet obtaining powerful and fast modules. Furthermore, the libraries were again significantly improved for speed and efficiency, along with support for huge files. A lot of effort has been invested to standardize parameter and flag names. Finally, GRASS GIS 7 comes with a series of new modules to analyse raster and vector data, along with a full temporal framework. For a detailed overview, see the list of new features. As a stable release series, 7.2.x enjoys long-term support.

Binaries/Installer download:

Source code download:

More details:

See also our detailed announcement:

https://trac.osgeo.org/grass/wiki/Grass7/NewFeatures72 (overview of new 7.2 stable release series)

https://grass.osgeo.org/grass72/manuals/addons/ (list of available addons)

First time users may explore the first steps tutorial after installation.

About GRASS GIS

The Geographic Resources Analysis Support System (https://grass.osgeo.org/), commonly referred to as GRASS GIS, is an Open Source Geographic Information System providing powerful raster, vector and geospatial processing capabilities in a single integrated software suite. GRASS GIS includes tools for spatial modeling, visualization of raster and vector data, management and analysis of geospatial data, and the processing of satellite and aerial imagery. It also provides the capability to produce sophisticated presentation graphics and hardcopy maps. GRASS GIS has been translated into about twenty languages and supports a huge array of data formats. It can be used either as a stand-alone application or as backend for other software packages such as QGIS and R geostatistics. It is distributed freely under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL). GRASS GIS is a founding member of the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo).

The GRASS Development Team, May 2017

The post GRASS GIS 7.2.1 released appeared first on GFOSS Blog | GRASS GIS Courses.

New major release: GRASS GIS 7.2.0 available

We are pleased to announce the stable release of GRASS GIS 7.2.0

What’s new in a nutshell

After almost two years of development the new stable major release GRASS GIS 7.2.0 is available. It provides more than 1950 stability fixes and manual improvements compared to the former stable release version 7.0.5. The new version includes a series of new modules to analyse raster and vector data along with new temporal algebra functionality.More than 50 new addons are also available. A summary of the new features is available at New Features in GRASS GIS 7.2.

About GRASS GIS 7: Its graphical user interface supports the user to make complex GIS operations as simple as possible. The updated Python interface to the C library permits users to create new GRASS GIS-Python modules in a simple way while yet obtaining powerful and fast modules. Furthermore, the libraries were again significantly improved for speed and efficiency, along with support for huge files. A lot of effort has been invested to standardize parameter and flag names. Finally, GRASS GIS 7 comes with a series of new modules to analyse raster and vector data, along with a full temporal framework. For a detailed overview, see the list of new features. As a stable release series, 7.2.x enjoys long-term support.

Binaries/Installer download:

Source code download:

More details:

See also our detailed announcement:

First time users may explore the first steps tutorial after installation.

About GRASS GIS

The Geographic Resources Analysis Support System (https://grass.osgeo.org/), commonly referred to as GRASS GIS, is an Open Source Geographic Information System providing powerful raster, vector and geospatial processing capabilities in a single integrated software suite. GRASS GIS includes tools for spatial modeling, visualization of raster and vector data, management and analysis of geospatial data, and the processing of satellite and aerial imagery. It also provides the capability to produce sophisticated presentation graphics and hardcopy maps. GRASS GIS has been translated into about twenty languages and supports a huge array of data formats. It can be used either as a stand-alone application or as backend for other software packages such as QGIS and R geostatistics. It is distributed freely under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL). GRASS GIS is a founding member of the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo).

The GRASS Development Team, December 2016

The post New major release: GRASS GIS 7.2.0 available appeared first on GFOSS Blog | GRASS GIS Courses.

Markus Neteler joins the management of mundialis in Bonn

Press release

From March 2016 onwards, Dr. Markus Neteler, a prominent head of the Open Source GIS scene, will join the management board of mundialis GmbH & Co. KG in Bonn, Germany. Founded in 2015, mundialis combines remote sensing and satellite data analysis in the field of Big Data with Open Source WebGIS solutions.

Since 2008, Dr. Neteler was the head of the GIS and remote sensing unit at the Edmund Mach Foundation in Trento (Italy) and worked in this capacity on numerous projects related to biodiversity, environmental and agricultural research. He is also a founding member of the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo), a nonprofit organization with headquarters in Delaware (USA), that promotes the development and use of free and open source geographic information systems (GIS). Since 1998 he coordinated the development of the well known GRASS GIS software project, a powerful Open Source GIS that supports processing of time series of several thousand raster, 3D raster or vector maps in a short time. Mongolia as seen by Sentinel-2A

Markus will keep his role as “Mr. GRASS” at mundialis, especially because the company also sees itself as a research and development enterprise that puts its focus on the open source interfaces between geoinformation and remote sensing. Although a new company, mundialis offers more than 50 years of experience in GIS, due to the background of its management. Besides Neteler, there are Till Adams and Hinrich Paulsen, both at the same time the founders and CEOs of terrestris in Bonn, a company that develops Open Source GIS solutions since 2002. These many years of experience in the construction of WebGIS and Geoportal architectures using free software as well as in the application of common OGC standards – are now combined with mundialis’ expertise in the processing of big data with spatial reference and remote sensing data.

Contact: http://www.mundialis.de/

The post Markus Neteler joins the management of mundialis in Bonn appeared first on GFOSS Blog | GRASS GIS Courses.

GRASS GIS 7.0.1 released – 32 years of GRASS GIS

What’s new in a nutshellgrass7_logo_500px

This release addresses some minor issues found in the first GRASS GIS 7.0.0 release published earlier this year. The new release provides a series of stability fixes in the core system and the graphical user interface, PyGRASS improvements, some manual enhancements, and a few language translations.

This release is the 32nd birthday release of GRASS GIS.

New in GRASS GIS 7: Its new graphical user interface supports the user in making complex GIS operations as simple as possible. A new Python interface to the C library permits users to create new GRASS GIS-Python modules in a simple way while yet obtaining powerful and fast modules. Furthermore, the libraries were significantly improved for speed and efficiency, along with support for huge files. A lot of effort has been invested to standardize parameter and flag names. Finally, GRASS GIS 7 comes with a series of new modules to analyse raster and vector data, along with a full temporal framework. For a detailed overview, see the list of new features. As a stable release 7.0 enjoys long-term support.

Source code download:

Binaries download:

More details:

See also our detailed announcement:

  http://trac.osgeo.org/grass/wiki/Grass7/NewFeatures (overview of new stable release series)First time users may explore the first steps tutorial after installation.

About GRASS GIS

The Geographic Resources Analysis Support System (http://grass.osgeo.org/), commonly referred to as GRASS GIS, is an Open Source Geographic Information System providing powerful raster, vector and geospatial processing capabilities in a single integrated software suite. GRASS GIS includes tools for spatial modeling, visualization of raster and vector data, management and analysis of geospatial data, and the processing of satellite and aerial imagery. It also provides the capability to produce sophisticated presentation graphics and hardcopy maps. GRASS GIS has been translated into about twenty languages and supports a huge array of data formats. It can be used either as a stand-alone application or as backend for other software packages such as QGIS and R geostatistics. It is distributed freely under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL). GRASS GIS is a founding member of the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo).

The GRASS Development Team, July 2015

The post GRASS GIS 7.0.1 released – 32 years of GRASS GIS appeared first on GFOSS Blog | GRASS GIS Courses.

Inofficial QGIS 2.8 RPMs for EPEL 7: Fedora 20, Fedora 21, Centos 7, Scientific Linux 7

qgis-icon_smallThanks to the work of Devrim Gündüz, Volker Fröhlich, Dave Johansen, Rex Dieter and other Fedora/EPEL packagers I had an easy going to prepare RPM packages of QGIS 2.8 Wien for Fedora 20 and 21, Centos 7, and Scientific Linux 7.

The base SRPM package I copied from Fedora’s koji server, modified the SPEC file in order to remove the now outdated PyQwt bindings (see bugzilla) and compiled QGIS 2.8 via the great COPR platform.

Repo: https://copr.fedoraproject.org/coprs/neteler/QGIS-2.8-Wien/

The following packages can now be installed and tested on epel-7-x86_64 (Centos 7, Scientific Linux 7, etc.), Fedora-20-x86_64, and Fedora-21-x86_64:

  • qgis 2.8.1
  • qgis-debuginfo 2.8.1
  • qgis-devel 2.8.1
  • qgis-grass 2.8.1
  • qgis-python 2.8.1
  • qgis-server 2.8.1

Installation instructions (run as “root” user or use “sudo”):

# EPEL7:
yum -y install epel-release
yum -y install wget
# https://copr.fedoraproject.org/coprs/neteler/python-OWSLib/
wget -O /etc/yum.repos.d/neteler-python-OWSLib-epel-7.repo https://copr.fedoraproject.org/coprs/neteler/python-OWSLib/repo/epel-7/neteler-python-OWSLib-epel-7.repo
yum -y update
yum -y install python-OWSLib
wget -O /etc/yum.repos.d/qgis-epel-7.repo https://copr.fedoraproject.org/coprs/neteler/QGIS-2.8-Wien/repo/epel-7/neteler-QGIS-2.8-Wien-epel-7.repo
yum update
yum install qgis qgis-grass qgis-python qgis-server

# Fedora 20:
wget -O /etc/yum.repos.d/qgis-epel-7.repo https://copr.fedoraproject.org/coprs/neteler/QGIS-2.8-Wien/repo/fedora-20/neteler-QGIS-2.8-Wien-fedora-20.repo
yum update
yum install qgis qgis-grass qgis-python qgis-server

# Fedora 21:
wget -O /etc/yum.repos.d/qgis-epel-7.repo https://copr.fedoraproject.org/coprs/neteler/QGIS-2.8-Wien/repo/fedora-21/neteler-QGIS-2.8-Wien-fedora-21.repo
yum update
yum install qgis qgis-grass qgis-python qgis-server

The other packages are optional (well, also qgis-grass, qgis-python, and qgis-server…).

Enjoy!

PS: Of course I hope that QGIS 2.8 officially hits EPEL7 anytime soon! My COPR repo is just a temporary bridge towards that goal.

EDIT 30 April 2015:

  • updated EPEL7 installation for python-OWSLib dependency

The post Inofficial QGIS 2.8 RPMs for EPEL 7: Fedora 20, Fedora 21, Centos 7, Scientific Linux 7 appeared first on GFOSS Blog | GRASS GIS Courses.

New stable release of GRASS GIS 7.0.0!

The GRASS GIS Development team has announced the release of the new major version GRASS GIS 7.0.0. This version provides many new functionalities including spatio-temporal database support, image segmentation, estimation of evapotranspiration and emissivity from satellite imagery, automatic line vertex densification during reprojection, more LIDAR support and a strongly improved graphical user interface experience. GRASS GIS 7.0.0 also offers significantly improved performance for many raster and vector modules: “Many processes that would take hours now take less than a minute, even on my small laptop!” explains Markus Neteler, the coordinator of the development team composed of academics and GIS professionals from around the world. The software is available for Linux, MS-Windows, Mac OSX and other operating systems.

Detailed announcement and software download:
http://grass.osgeo.org/news/42/15/GRASS-GIS-7-0-0/

About GRASS GIS
The Geographic Resources Analysis Support System (http://grass.osgeo.org/), commonly referred to as GRASS GIS, is an open source Geographic Information System providing powerful raster, vector and geospatial processing capabilities in a single integrated software suite. GRASS GIS includes tools for spatial modeling, visualization of raster and vector data, management and analysis of geospatial data, and the processing of satellite and aerial imagery. It also provides the capability to produce sophisticated presentation graphics and hardcopy maps. GRASS GIS has been translated into about twenty languages and supports a huge array of data formats. It can be used either as a stand-alone application or as backend for other software packages such as QGIS and R geostatistics. It is distributed freely under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL). GRASS GIS is a founding member of the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo).

The post New stable release of GRASS GIS 7.0.0! appeared first on GFOSS Blog | GRASS GIS Courses.

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