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QGIS Planet

QGIS atlas on non geometry tables

This is proof that no matter how close you are to a project you can still miss some really cool stuff that you never knew or considered was possible.

The problem to solve:

You have a CSV with a row of colours. Each row should be a new map and each column is the colour for that feature.

This is example of that kind of input

A       B
#93b2f3 #FF0000 
#dfbdbb #FF0000
#f9d230 #FF0000

This questhion was asked on GIS.SE this morning. When I first saw it I had no idea it was even possible, I was thinking along the same lines as the person asking, that it would have to be done with Python. Not hard, but a lot harder then something built in and I put it in the too hard basket. I thought the atlas can almost do that, almost but not really.

Well almost was wrong. It can.

Note: You will need QGIS 2.5 (2.6 when released) for this to work

Lets make some cool maps! (and go to GIS.SE and upvote Nyalls answer)

First open your vector layer and the CSV. Don't worry about style just yet, we will do it later.

Create a composer and add your map.

Here comes the first part of the trick.

Enable Atlas and set the coverage layer to the CSV layer. Wait? What? That doesn't make any sense. If you think about it for a while it does. We need a map for each row (or "feature") in the CSV and atlas does just that.

atlas_colours.png

How do we style the features? Well here is the other part of the trick. In 2.6 there is a magic expression function that returns a field value from another feature. And it's as simple as attribute( $atlasfeature , 'A' ) - give me the attribute from the current atlas feature for field 'A'. Simple.

First we categorize our features so we have a symbol for each feature. I'm using a sample layer I have but you can understand how this works. The first feature is A and the other is B, etc, etc

render.png

Now to use another awesome feature of QGIS. The data defined symbol properties (and labels too). Change each symbol and define the colour data defined property. Using attribute( $atlasfeature , 'A' ) for the first one and attribute( $atlasfeature , 'B' ) for the second.

atlas_feature.png

That is it. Now jump back over to your composer and enable Atlas preview.

atlas1.png

atlas2.png

Bam! Magic! How awesome is that!

Now my other thought was. "Ok cool, but the legend won't update". I should learn by now not to assume anything. The legend will also update based on the colours from the feature.

atlas1_legend.png

atlas2_legend.png

How far can we take this. What if you need the label to match the colour. Simple just make the label text look like this:

<h1 style='color:[% "A" %]'>This is the colour of A</h1>

atlas1_label.png

Heaps of credit to Nyall and the others who have added all this great stuff to the composer, atlas, and the data defined properties. It's not something that you will do every day but it's great to see the flexibility of QGIS in these situations.

You can even make the background colour of the page match the atlas feature

atlas1_back.png

but don't do that because people might think you are mad ;)

QGIS atlas on non geometry tables

This is proof that no matter how close you are to a project you can still miss some really cool stuff that you never knew or considered was possible.

The problem to solve:

You have a CSV with a row of colours. Each row should be a new map and each column is the colour for that feature.

This is example of that kind of input

A       B
#93b2f3 #FF0000 
#dfbdbb #FF0000
#f9d230 #FF0000

This questhion was asked on GIS.SE this morning. When I first saw it I had no idea it was even possible, I was thinking along the same lines as the person asking, that it would have to be done with Python. Not hard, but a lot harder then something built in and I put it in the too hard basket. I thought the atlas can almost do that, almost but not really.

Well almost was wrong. It can.

Note: You will need QGIS 2.5 (2.6 when released) for this to work

Lets make some cool maps! (and go to GIS.SE and upvote Nyalls answer)

First open your vector layer and the CSV. Don't worry about style just yet, we will do it later.

Create a composer and add your map.

Here comes the first part of the trick.

Enable Atlas and set the coverage layer to the CSV layer. Wait? What? That doesn't make any sense. If you think about it for a while it does. We need a map for each row (or "feature") in the CSV and atlas does just that.

Alt Text

How do we style the features? Well here is the other part of the trick. In 2.6 there is a magic expression function that returns a field value from another feature. And it's as simple as attribute( $atlasfeature , 'A' ) - give me the attribute from the current atlas feature for field 'A'. Simple.

First we categorize our features so we have a symbol for each feature. I'm using a sample layer I have but you can understand how this works. The first feature is A and the other is B, etc, etc

Alt Text

Now to use another awesome feature of QGIS. The data defined symbol properties (and labels too). Change each symbol and define the colour data defined property. Using attribute( $atlasfeature , 'A' ) for the first one and attribute( $atlasfeature , 'B' ) for the second.

Alt Text

That is it. Now jump back over to your composer and enable Atlas preview.

Alt Text

Alt Text

Bam! Magic! How awesome is that!

Now my other thought was. "Ok cool, but the legend won't update". I should learn by now not to assume anything. The legend will also update based on the colours from the feature.

Alt Text

Alt Text

How far can we take this. What if you need the label to match the colour. Simple just make the label text look like this:

<h1 style='color:[% "A" %]'>This is the colour of A</h1>

Alt Text

Heaps of credit to Nyall and the others who have added all this great stuff to the composer, atlas, and the data defined properties. It's not something that you will do every day but it's great to see the flexibility of QGIS in these situations.

You can even make the background colour of the page match the atlas feature

Alt Text

but don't do that because people might think you are mad ;)

QGIS atlas on non geometry tables

This is proof that no matter how close you are to a project you can still miss some really cool stuff that you never knew or considered was possible.

The problem to solve:

You have a CSV with a row of colours. Each row should be a new map and each column is the colour for that feature.

This is example of that kind of input

A       B
#93b2f3 #FF0000 
#dfbdbb #FF0000
#f9d230 #FF0000

This questhion was asked on GIS.SE this morning. When I first saw it I had no idea it was even possible, I was thinking along the same lines as the person asking, that it would have to be done with Python. Not hard, but a lot harder then something built in and I put it in the too hard basket. I thought the atlas can almost do that, almost but not really.

Well almost was wrong. It can.

Note: You will need QGIS 2.5 (2.6 when released) for this to work

Lets make some cool maps! (and go to GIS.SE and upvote Nyalls answer)

First open your vector layer and the CSV. Don't worry about style just yet, we will do it later.

Create a composer and add your map.

Here comes the first part of the trick.

Enable Atlas and set the coverage layer to the CSV layer. Wait? What? That doesn't make any sense. If you think about it for a while it does. We need a map for each row (or "feature") in the CSV and atlas does just that.

Alt Text

How do we style the features? Well here is the other part of the trick. In 2.6 there is a magic expression function that returns a field value from another feature. And it's as simple as attribute( $atlasfeature , 'A' ) - give me the attribute from the current atlas feature for field 'A'. Simple.

First we categorize our features so we have a symbol for each feature. I'm using a sample layer I have but you can understand how this works. The first feature is A and the other is B, etc, etc

Alt Text

Now to use another awesome feature of QGIS. The data defined symbol properties (and labels too). Change each symbol and define the colour data defined property. Using attribute( $atlasfeature , 'A' ) for the first one and attribute( $atlasfeature , 'B' ) for the second.

Alt Text

That is it. Now jump back over to your composer and enable Atlas preview.

Alt Text

Alt Text

Bam! Magic! How awesome is that!

Now my other thought was. "Ok cool, but the legend won't update". I should learn by now not to assume anything. The legend will also update based on the colours from the feature.

Alt Text

Alt Text

How far can we take this. What if you need the label to match the colour. Simple just make the label text look like this:

<h1 style='color:[% "A" %]'>This is the colour of A</h1>

Alt Text

Heaps of credit to Nyall and the others who have added all this great stuff to the composer, atlas, and the data defined properties. It's not something that you will do every day but it's great to see the flexibility of QGIS in these situations.

You can even make the background colour of the page match the atlas feature

Alt Text

but don't do that because people might think you are mad ;)

Labels as text in SVG exports

Today’s post is inspired by a recent thread on the QGIS user mailing list titled “exporting text to Illustrator?”. The issue was that with the introduction of the new labeling system, all labels were exported as paths when creating an SVG. Unnoticed by almost everyone (and huge thanks to Alex Mandel for pointing out!) an option has been added to 2.4 by Larry Shaffer which allows exporting labels as texts again.

To export labels as text, open the Automatic Placement Settings (button in the upper right corner of the label dialog) and uncheck the Draw text as outlines option.

Screenshot 2014-09-20 21.03.26

Note that we are also cautioned that

For now the developers recommend you only toggle this option right
before exporting
and that you recheck it after.

Alex even recorded a video showcasing the functionality:


Registration is open

Registration is open now for the Scottish QGIS user group.  You can register here:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/qgis-uk-scottish-user-group-tickets-13092023595

The planned agenda for the day is as follows:

  • arrive for coffee 9.00
  • welcome and intro 9.30
  • workshops 10.00 – 12.00
  • lightning talks 12.00 – 12.30
  • lunch 12.30 – 13.30
  • afternoon presentations 13.30 – 16.00
  • close
  • geobeers

There is a great line up of talks and after feedback from the last user group there are now two workshops in the morning for you to choose from.

  • Workshop 1: QGIS plugin development with Python
  • Workshop 2: Using the QGIS Processing module
  • Michael Spencer – Raster time series analysis using FOSS4G
  • Heikki Versanto – Visualising population demographics in 3D
  • Simon Willcocks – Using PgRouting with OS ITN in QGIS
  • Ross McDonald – Cartographic experiments in QGIS
  • Mag Low – Rendering OS MasterMap buildings using QGIS2threeJS
  • Paul Weedon – PostGIS, QGIS and Associated Street Data
  • Lightning talks – a few minutes to tell us about, well, anything really.

Thanks to EDINA, thinkWhere and Ordnance Survey for helping to make the day happen!


Exporting QGIS symbols as images

Ever wanted to export your QGIS symbols as images? Yes. Well here is some Python code that will let you do just that:

from PyQt4.QtCore import QSize
from PyQt4.QtGui import QImage, QPainter

style = QgsStyleV2.defaultStyle()
names = style.symbolNames()
size = QSize(64, 64)

for name in names:
    symbol = style.symbol(name)
    if not symbol.type() == QgsSymbolV2.Marker:
        continue

    image = QImage(size, QImage.Format_ARGB32_Premultiplied)
    image.fill(0) 
    painter = QPainter(image)
    symbol.drawPreviewIcon(painter, size)
    painter.end()
    image.save(r"C:\temp\{}.png".format(name), "PNG")

Or in 2.6 it's even easier:

from PyQt4.QtCore import QSize
from PyQt4.QtGui import QImage, QPainter

style = QgsStyleV2.defaultStyle()
names = style.symbolNames()
size = QSize(64, 64)

for name in names:
    symbol = style.symbol(name)
    if not symbol.type() == QgsSymbolV2.Marker:
        continue

    image = symbol.asImage(size)
    image.save(r"C:\temp\{}.png".format(name), "PNG")

Bam!

Alt Text

Why? Because we can.

Exporting QGIS symbols as images

Ever wanted to export your QGIS symbols as images? Yes. Well here is some Python code that will let you do just that:

from PyQt4.QtCore import QSize
from PyQt4.QtGui import QImage, QPainter

style = QgsStyleV2.defaultStyle()
names = style.symbolNames()
size = QSize(64, 64)

for name in names:
    symbol = style.symbol(name)
    if not symbol.type() == QgsSymbolV2.Marker:
        continue

    image = QImage(size, QImage.Format_ARGB32_Premultiplied)
    image.fill(0) 
    painter = QPainter(image)
    symbol.drawPreviewIcon(painter, size)
    painter.end()
    image.save(r"C:\temp\{}.png".format(name), "PNG")

Or in 2.6 it's even easier:

from PyQt4.QtCore import QSize
from PyQt4.QtGui import QImage, QPainter

style = QgsStyleV2.defaultStyle()
names = style.symbolNames()
size = QSize(64, 64)

for name in names:
    symbol = style.symbol(name)
    if not symbol.type() == QgsSymbolV2.Marker:
        continue

    image = symbol.asImage(size)
    image.save(r"C:\temp\{}.png".format(name), "PNG")

Bam!

Alt Text

Why? Because we can.

Exporting QGIS symbols as images

Ever wanted to export your QGIS symbols as images? Yes. Well here is some Python code that will let you do just that:

from PyQt4.QtCore import QSize
from PyQt4.QtGui import QImage, QPainter

style = QgsStyleV2.defaultStyle()
names = style.symbolNames()
size = QSize(64, 64)

for name in names:
    symbol = style.symbol(name)
    if not symbol.type() == QgsSymbolV2.Marker:
        continue
    
    image = QImage(size, QImage.Format_ARGB32_Premultiplied)
    image.fill(0) 
    painter = QPainter(image)
    symbol.drawPreviewIcon(painter, size)
    painter.end()
    image.save(r"C:\temp\{}.png".format(name), "PNG")

Or in 2.6 it's even easier:

from PyQt4.QtCore import QSize
from PyQt4.QtGui import QImage, QPainter

style = QgsStyleV2.defaultStyle()
names = style.symbolNames()
size = QSize(64, 64)

for name in names:
    symbol = style.symbol(name)
    if not symbol.type() == QgsSymbolV2.Marker:
        continue
        
    image = symbol.asImage(size)
    image.save(r"C:\temp\{}.png".format(name), "PNG")

Bam!

symbols.png

Why? Because we can.

QGIS OpenLayers alternative: ArcGIS online basemap

The QGIS Ireland user group posted a method of adding the ArcGIS Online global raster basemap to QGIS to use as an alternative to the openLayers plugin:

http://ieqgis.wordpress.com/2014/08/09/adding-esris-online-world-imagery-dataset-to-qgis/


Gary Sherman wins the Sol Katz award

This year Gary Sherman won the annual Sol Katz award. To quote the OSGEO page about the award:

The Sol Katz Award for Geospatial Free and Open Source Software (GFOSS) is awarded annually by OSGeo to individuals who have demonstrated leadership in the GFOSS community. Recipients of the award will have contributed significantly through their activities to advance open source ideals in the geospatial realm. The hope is that the award will both acknowledge the work of community members, and pay tribute to one of its founders, for years to come.

A couple of years ago I did an interview with Gary about the beginning of QGIS:

and part2:

I am so pleased that the Sol Katz award committee has seen fit to present this award to Gary. The fact that Gary created QGIS and open sourced its code has had a profound effect on many people’s lives – especially my own. Participating in QGIS for the last decade+ has immeasurably improved my own life and enabled me to eke out a comfortable living doing something I love. Hardly a day goes without me receiving an email in my inbox from someone in a far flung place telling me how they are using QGIS and how it is making their world a better place.

Presenting this award to Gary is a long overdue recognition and ‘thank you’ to the person who started a project that has become the rally point for an incredible, diverse and  friendly bunch of people, and a daily use tool for hundreds of thousands of users how there who may not even know who Gary is. QGIS rocks Gary, and so do you!

Here is Gary’s acceptance speech:

 

 

Slides FOSS4G 2014

Slides from our presentations at FOSS4G 2014 in Portland/Oregon:

@PirminKalberer

Selective data removal in an elevation map by means of floodfilling

Do you also sometimes get maps which contain zero (0) rather than NULL (no data) in some parts of the map? This can be easily solved with “floodfilling”, even in a GIS.

My original map looks like this (here, Trentino elevation model):

The light blue parts should be no data (NULL) rather than zero (0)...

Now what? In a paint software we would simply use bucket fill but what about GIS data? Well, we can do something similar using “clumping”. It requires a bit of computational time but works perfectly, even for large DEMs, e.g., all Italy at 20m resolution. Using the open source software GRASS GIS 7, we can compute all “clumps” (that are many for a floating point DEM!):

# first we set the computational region to the raster map:
g.region rast=pat_DTM_2008_derived_2m -p
r.clump pat_DTM_2008_derived_2m out=pat_DTM_2008_derived_2m_clump

The resulting clump map produced by r.clump is nicely colorized:

Clumped map derived from DEM (generated with r.clump)

As we can see, the area of interest (province) is now surrounded by three clumps. With a simple map algebra statement (r.mapcalc or GUI calculator) we can create a MASK by assigning these outer boundary clumps to NULL and the other “good” clumps to 1:

r.mapcalc "no_data_mask = if(pat_DTM_2008_derived_2m_clump == 264485050 || \
   pat_DTM_2008_derived_2m_clump == 197926480 || \
   pat_DTM_2008_derived_2m_clump == 3, null(), 1)"

This mask map looks like this:

Mask map from all clumps except for the large outer clumps

We now activate this MASK and generate a copy of the original map into a new map name by using map algebra again (this just keeps the data matched by the MASK). Eventually we remove the MASK and verify the result:

# apply the mask
r.mask no_data_mask
# generate a copy of the DEM, filter on the fly
r.mapcalc "pat_DTM_2008_derived_2m_fixed = pat_DTM_2008_derived_2m"
# assign a nice color table
r.colors pat_DTM_2008_derived_2m_fixed color=srtmplus
# remove the MASK
r.mask -r

And the final DEM is now properly cleaned up in terms of NULL values (no data):

DEM cleaned up for no data

Enjoy.

The post Selective data removal in an elevation map by means of floodfilling appeared first on GFOSS Blog | GRASS GIS Courses.

Share and manage your Data with QGIS Cloud and WFS-T

A lot of people are using QGIS Cloud as a service with ready to use QGIS webclient. It’s very easy to publish data and share maps in this way. But QGIS Cloud has more power under the hood. A not so obvious feature of QGIS Cloud is the option to share your data via Web Feature Service (WFS) and manage them via Web Feature Service Transactional (WFS-T). “The basic Web Feature Service allows querying and retrieval of features. A transactional Web Feature Service (WFS-T) allows creation, deletion, and updating of features” (Wikipedia). With WFS-T you have full access to your vector data for editing over the web. Since QGIS Server includes WFS-T functionality, you can manage and edit your data served by QGIS Cloud from every client supporting WFS-T. In addition, with QGIS Cloud Pro you have the option to control access to your published WFS.

How to setup a QGIS Cloud WFS-T in few steps:

  1. Setup a QGIS Project containing the data you like to pubish as WFS-T

  2. Load local vector data of your choice to your project.

  3. Define vector layers you wish to publish and set the appropriate settings for them in the following way:
    • open the Project Properties -> OWS Server tab.
    • scroll to the WFS-Capabilities section and setup the appropriate settings. Tick Published, Update, Insert and Delete for every layer you want to publish.

  • additionally you can set the published fields of every layer in the Layer Properties -> Fields tab.

  • Publish the project on QGIS Cloud.
    • save the project. (If you don’t have installed the QGIS Cloud plugin, than install it from the official QGIS Plugin Repository)
    • open the QGIS Cloud plugin and log in your QGIS Cloud account. (If you don’t have a QGIS Cloud account, sign up a new account).
    • upload the local data to your QGIS Cloud database (if you don’t have a QGIS Cloud database, create one from the QGIS Cloud plugin).
    • publish the project via QGIS Cloud plugin.
    • that’s it!

Have a look at the Services tab of the QGIS Cloud Plugin. There you will find the URL for Public WMS. Your just created WFS has the same URL. Now you can start working with WFS and WFS-T.

Working with WFS-T in QGIS Desktop

You can access your WFS-T with QGIS or any other client which supports WFS and WFS-T. As an example here we show how to access WFS with QGIS Desktop:

  1. Open the QGIS WFS Server connections dialog (Layer -> Add WFS Layer … ).
  2. Add a new connection
  3. Give the connection a name of your choice and add the above created URL
  4. Click connect and you will see the just published WFS layers
  5. Add one or more of them to your project

Thus you have set the Update, Insert and Delete options for the WFS, these layers can be edited in QGIS like any other editable layer.

All the services published under QGIS Cloud Free are public and accessible by everyone. If you need resctricted access , you can order the QGIS Cloud Pro plan.

Follow @QGISCloud on Twitter for QGISCloud related news and infos.

Sourcepole at FOSS4G 2014 in Portland

In one week, the 2014 FOSS4G Conference will start in Portland/Oregon. Sourcepole supports this major event as a bronze sponsor.

Our conference contributions:

Workshop presented by Horst Düster (@moazagotl)

  • Tuesday afternoon: QGIS Plugin Development with PyQt4 and PyQGIS

Presentations by Pirmin Kalberer (@PirminKalberer)

  • Thursday, Session 2, Track 7, 13:00 - 13:25: State of QGIS Server
  • Thursday, Session 2, Track 7, 13:30 - 13:55: From Nottingham to PDX: QGIS 2014 roundup
  • Thursday, Session 3, Track 6, 16:25 - 13:25: Easy ETL with OGR

Meet Pirmin and Horst at Sourcepole’s exhibition booth and have a look at our latest products.

We’re looking forward to meet you in Portland next week!

Follow @Sourcepole for selected QGIS news and other Open Source Geospatial related infos.

Scottish QGIS User Group – 21 October, Edinburgh

The next QGIS user group meeting in Scotland is happening on 21st October 2014.
It is being held in the School of Informatics at Edinburgh University.  For more info about the venue: http://www.ed.ac.uk/schools-departments/informatics/about/location

This is your chance to offer a short talk or presentation or workshop so we can build an exciting programme for the day.  The final programme and agenda will be released closer to the date.  Please let me know through the contact form or comments or twitter (@mixedbredie) if you have a presentation or talk you would like to share.

Ross


WMS Legend Plugin for Leaflet

This weekend I was updating our map gallery at http://maps.kartoza.com and I wanted to have WMS legends in my maps. The maps are mostly generated using QGIS server which also produces a nice looking graphic for its getLegendGraphic requests. Since Leaflet does not seem have a legend control out of the box, I wrote a small leaflet plugin to do it.

Leaflet WMS Legend Plugin

In the future I may extend the control to automatically fetch getLegendGraphics from all loaded WMS layers, but for now it simply takes a complete legend graphic URI as parameter.

Leaflet is a great web mapping client and extending it with little plugins is very easy to do. If you want to use the plugin I wrote, head over to the plugin repository and give it a try!

Sourcepole Kursprogramm Herbst 2014

Im November 2014 bietet Sourcepole wieder sein kompetentes Kursprogramm rund um alle GDI Komponenten an. Zu allen Kursen gehört umfangreiches Kursmaterial, Mittagessen und Kaffepausen. Bei Buchung eines Grundkurses und dem darauf folgenden Aufbaukurs erhalten die Teilnehmer Rabatt auf den Kurspreis.

Geo-Datenbank:

  • PostgreSQL / PostGIS Einführung (3. - 4. November 2014)
  • PostgreSQL / PostGIS für Fortgeschrittene (5. November 2014)

Desktop GIS

  • QGIS 2.4 / Enterprise Desktop Grundkurs (10. - 11. November 2014)
  • QGIS 2.4 / Enterprise Desktop für Power User (12. November 2014)

GDI

  • Verteilte GDI mit der QGIS Suite und PostgreSQL (20. November 2014)

QGIS Programmierung

  • QGIS 2.4 / Enterprise Plugin Entwicklung mit PyQt4 und PyQGIS (17. - 18. November 2014)

Informationen zu den Kursen und die Online Anmeldung finden Sie im Kursprogramm

Wir freuen uns darauf Sie in Zürich begrüssen zu können.

Fundraising for Eloise and Heartfelt

The death of our daughter was one of the hardest things my wife and I have ever had to deal with. It's not something that I wish anyone ever have to experience and feel really sorry for those who have had to do it many times. There is something really raw about losing your own flesh and blood. It cuts deep, really really deep. There are really no words to describe the emptiness that you feel, or the feelings that follow after the event. Even with all the pain of loosing a child there is a great Australian service that helps to capture some of the final monents. The service is called Heartfelt and we used them for Ellie.

Heartfelt is a great free service that provides a photo session, including editing and prints (hard and digital) after, in the last and final days. This is the quote from their site:

Heartfelt is a volunteer organisation of professional photographers from all over Australia dedicated to giving the gift of photographic memories to families that have experienced stillbirths, premature births, or have children with serious and terminal illnesses.

Heartfelt is dedicated to providing this gift to families in a caring, compassionate manner.

All services are provided free of charge

Pretty impressive stuff. The last thing you want to have to do in a time like that is shell out for photos when you have other pressing issues.

As Ellie's 1st Birthday is coming in up October Stace and I would love to raise enough money to donate a camera pack to a hospital though Heartfelt in Elly's name. We have created a fundraiser page in her name at: http://www.mycause.com.au/page/79669/eloises1stbirthdayheartfelt in order collect dontations for anyone who would like to help.

Camera packs can be donated to a hospital to allow staff at the hospital to capture photos if Heartfelt can't make it. The bonus is that Heartfelt will still edit and print the photos. How bloody awesome is that! More info on the camera packs is at: http://www.mycause.com.au/page/79669/eloises1stbirthdayheartfelt

We would be greatful for any donations, big or small, so we can donate a camera pack in Elly's name.

We love and miss you a lot Eloise.

Fundraising for Eloise and Heartfelt

The death of our daughter was one of the hardest things my wife and I have ever had to deal with. It's not something that I wish anyone ever have to experience and feel really sorry for those who have had to do it many times. There is something really raw about losing your own flesh and blood. It cuts deep, really really deep. There are really no words to describe the emptiness that you feel, or the feelings that follow after the event. Even with all the pain of loosing a child there is a great Australian service that helps to capture some of the final monents. The service is called Heartfelt and we used them for Ellie.

Heartfelt is a great free service that provides a photo session, including editing and prints (hard and digital) after, in the last and final days. This is the quote from their site:

Heartfelt is a volunteer organisation of professional photographers from all over Australia dedicated to giving the gift of photographic memories to families that have experienced stillbirths, premature births, or have children with serious and terminal illnesses.

Heartfelt is dedicated to providing this gift to families in a caring, compassionate manner.

All services are provided free of charge

Pretty impressive stuff. The last thing you want to have to do in a time like that is shell out for photos when you have other pressing issues.

As Ellie's 1st Birthday is coming in up October Stace and I would love to raise enough money to donate a camera pack to a hospital though Heartfelt in Elly's name. We have created a fundraiser page in her name at: http://www.mycause.com.au/page/79669/eloises1stbirthdayheartfelt in order collect dontations for anyone who would like to help.

Camera packs can be donated to a hospital to allow staff at the hospital to capture photos if Heartfelt can't make it. The bonus is that Heartfelt will still edit and print the photos. How bloody awesome is that! More info on the camera packs is at: http://www.mycause.com.au/page/79669/eloises1stbirthdayheartfelt

We would be greatful for any donations, big or small, so we can donate a camera pack in Elly's name.

We love and miss you a lot Eloise.

Fundraising for Eloise and Heartfelt

The death of our daughter was one of the hardest things my wife and I have ever had to deal with. It's not something that I wish anyone ever have to experience and feel really sorry for those who have had to do it many times. There is something really raw about lossing your own flesh and blood. It cuts deep, really really deep. There are really no words to describe the emptiness that you feel, or the feelings that follow after the event. Even with all the pain of lossing a child there is a great Australian service that helps to capture some of the final monents. The service is called Heartfelt and we used them for Elly.

Heartfelt is a great free service that provides a photo session, including editing and prints (hard and digital) after, in the last and final days. This is the quote from their site:

Heartfelt is a volunteer organisation of professional photographers from all over Australia dedicated to giving the gift of photographic memories to families that have experienced stillbirths, premature births, or have children with serious and terminal illnesses.

Heartfelt is dedicated to providing this gift to families in a caring, compassionate manner.

All services are provided free of charge

Pretty impressive stuff. The last thing you want to have to do in a time like that is shell out for photos when you have other pressing issues.

As Elly's 1st Birthday is coming in up October Stace and I would love to raise enough money to donate a camera pack to a hospital though Heartfelt in Elly's name. We have created a fundraiser page in her name at: http://www.mycause.com.au/page/79669/eloises1stbirthdayheartfelt in order collect dontations for anyone who would like to help.

Camera packs can be donated to a hospital to allow staff at the hospital to capture photos if Heartfelt can't make it. The bonus is that Heartfelt will still edit and print the photos. How bloody awesome is that! More info on the camera packs is at: http://www.mycause.com.au/page/79669/eloises1stbirthdayheartfelt

We would be greatful for any donations, big or small, so we can donate a camera pack in Elly's name.

We love and miss you a lot Eloise.

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